Applying Machine Learning to the Universe's Mysteries

#artificialintelligence

Computers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. They are also being trained as infallible problem-solvers and fast learners. And now, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe's greatest mysteries. The team used thousands of images from simulated high-energy particle collisions to train computer networks to identify important features. The researchers programmed powerful arrays known as neural networks to serve as a sort of hive-like digital brain in analyzing and interpreting the images of the simulated particle debris left over from the collisions.


Applying machine learning to the universe's mysteries

#artificialintelligence

Computers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. We are even teaching them to be infallible problem-solvers and fast learners.


Video game tests your skills in a climate change apocalypse

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new video game pulls inspiration from the nostalgic 1980s game'Oregon Trail', but adds a futuristic twist where gamers can test their skills in a climate change apocalypse. Called'Climate Trail', refugees travel through a world destroyed by climate change while encountering dangerous scenarios, such as heatwaves and melting Artic ice, until they reach a safe zone in Canada. Characters in the game will also stop along the path to share scientific facts about global warming, sea level rise and greenhouse gas emissions throughout the game. In ' Climate Trail ' refugees travel through a world destroyed by climate change while encountering dangerous scenarios, such as heatwaves and melting Artic ice, until they reach a safe zone in Canada The Oregon Trail became a hallmark in elementary schools in the 1980s and was designed to teach children about the lives of 19th-century pioneers as they traveled across the United States in search of a better life. The player assumes the role of a wagon leader guiding a party of settlers from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon's Willamette Valley via a covered wagon in 1848.


Using Machine Learning to Solving the Universe's Mysteries

#artificialintelligence

Computers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. We are even teaching them to be infallible problem-solvers and fast learners. And now, physicists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe's greatest mysteries. The team fed thousands of images from simulated high-energy particle collisions to train computer networks to identify important features. The researchers programmed powerful arrays known as neural networks to serve as a sort of hivelike digital brain in analyzing and interpreting the images of the simulated particle debris left over from the collisions.


Applying Machine Learning to the Universe's Mysteries

#artificialintelligence

Computers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. We are even teaching them to be infallible problem-solvers and fast learners.