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China makes it a criminal offense to publish deepfakes or fake news without disclosure

#artificialintelligence

China has released a new government policy designed to prevent the spread of fake news and misleading videos created using artificial intelligence, otherwise known as deepfakes. The new rule, reported earlier today by Reuters, bans the publishing of false information or deepfakes online without proper disclosure that the post in question was created with AI or VR technology. Failure to disclose this is now a criminal offense, the Chinese government says. The rules go into effect on January 1st, 2020, and will be enforced by the Cyberspace Administration of China. "With the adoption of new technologies, such as deepfake, in online video and audio industries, there have been risks in using such content to disrupt social order and violate people's interests, creating political risks and bringing a negative impact to national security and social stability," the CAC said in a notice to online video hosting websites on Friday, according to the South China Morning Post.


China makes it a criminal offense to publish deepfakes or fake news without disclosure

#artificialintelligence

China has released a new government policy designed to prevent the spread of fake news and misleading videos created using artificial intelligence, otherwise known as deepfakes. The new rule, reported earlier today by Reuters, bans the publishing of false information or deepfakes online without proper disclosure that the post in question was created with AI or VR technology. Failure to disclose this is now a criminal offense, the Chinese government says. The rules go into effect on January 1st, 2020, and will be enforced by the Cyberspace Administration of China. "With the adoption of new technologies, such as deepfake, in online video and audio industries, there have been risks in using such content to disrupt social order and violate people's interests, creating political risks and bringing a negative impact to national security and social stability," the CAC said in a notice to online video hosting websites on Friday, according to the South China Morning Post.


A Deepfake Deep Dive into the Murky World of Digital Imitation

#artificialintelligence

About a year ago, top deepfake artist Hao Li came to a disturbing realization: Deepfakes, i.e. the technique of human-image synthesis based on artificial intelligence (AI) to create fake content, is rapidly evolving. In fact, Li believes that in as soon as six months, deepfake videos will be completely undetectable. And that's spurring security and privacy concerns as the AI behind the technology becomes commercialized – and gets in the hands of malicious actors. Li, for his part, has seen the positives of the technology as a pioneering computer graphics and vision researcher, particularly for entertainment. He has worked his magic on various high-profile deepfake applications – from leading the charge in putting Paul Walker into Furious 7 after the actor died before the film finished production, to creating the facial-animation technology that Apple now uses in its Animoji feature in the iPhone X.


Deepfakes and the 2020 US elections: what (did not) happen

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In retrospect, Nisos experts made the right forecast. However, this was a clear minority opinion. Before and after their report, dozens of politicians and institutions drew considerable attention to the approaching danger: 'imagine a scenario where, on the eve of next year's presidential election, the Democratic nominee appears in a video where he or she endorses President Trump. Now, imagine it the other way around.' (Sprangler, 2019). It is fair to say that deepfakes' high potential for disinformation was noticed long before these hypothetical consequences were evoked, mainly because they were revealed to be highly credible. Two examples: 'In an online quiz, 49 percent of people who visited our site said they incorrectly believed Nixon's synthetically altered face was real and 65 percent thought his voice was real' (Panetta et al, 2020), or'Two-thirds of participants believed that one day it would be impossible to discern a real video from a fake one.


China makes it offence to publish deepfakes without disclosure - Express Computer

#artificialintelligence

In a bid to tackle the spread of fake news and misleading videos created using artificial intelligence (AI) and bots, China has released new rules that ban online video and audio providers from using deep learning to produce fake news without a proper disclosure. Failing to provide a disclosure that the post in question was created with AI or VR technology is now a criminal offence, according to the Chinese government. The rules go into effect on January 1st, 2020, and will be enforced by the Cyberspace Administration of China, The Verge reported. The regulation comes about one-and-a-half months after California introduced legislation to make political deepfakes illegal, outlawing the creation or distribution of videos, images, or audio of politicians doctored to resemble real footage within 60 days of an election. The new regulation published said that both providers and users of online video news and audio services are not allowed to use new technologies such as deep learning and virtual reality to create, distribute and broadcast fake news, according to South China Morning Post.