Fedor the six foot-tall robo-naut lends astronauts a helping hand on board the ISS

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russia's pioneering humanoid robot Fedor has started assisting astronauts on board the International Space Station. Video footage reveals the six-foot tall robot holding a towel and a drill before handing the power tool to an astronaut. The robot was sent into space to learn new skills so that it and others like it can carry out dangerous operations instead of astronauts, such as space walks. Fedor, the nickname of the pioneering robot, stands at six foot tall, weighs 353 pounds and can perform complex movements by mimicking a human on Earth. Roscosmos hopes it will help astronauts carry out tasks remotely.


Russian humanoid learns how to shoot a gun with both hands

Daily Mail - Science & tech

From lifting weights to driving a jeep, Russia's humanoid has learned a range of skills for when it takes off for a mission to the moon in 2021. Deemed the'cyber cosmonaut', Fedor has now demonstrated a new skill that is vital in developing its fine motor skills and decision algorithms. The massive robot's latest venture brought it to a shooting range where it squared up in front of a target, pulled the trigger and shot its first handgun with both hands. Fedor has now demonstrated a new skill that is vital in developing its fine motor skills and decision algorithms. The massive robot's latest venture brought it to a shooting range where it squared up in front of a target, pulled the trigger and shot its first handgun using both hands Russia's plan to build a colony on the moon has begun taking shape.


First humanoid Russian robot, Fedor, flies to International Space Station

The Japan Times

MOSCOW – Russia on Thursday launched an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the International Space Station. Named Fedor, for Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research with identification number Skybot F850, the robot is the first ever sent up by Russia. Fedor blasted off in a Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft at 6:38 a.m. The Soyuz is set to dock with the space station on Saturday and stay till Sept. 7. Soyuz ships are normally manned on such trips, but on Thursday no humans are traveling in order to test a new emergency rescue system. Instead of cosmonauts, Fedor was strapped into a specially adapted pilot's seat, with a small Russian flag in his hand.


Putin's robo-nauts 'to be in space by 2019'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russia is planning to blast two robot astronauts into space to work on the international space station. Scientists have developed the advanced machines, named FEDOR, to conduct rescues - even though they have recently been recently trained to use firearms. According to RIA Novosti, the robots could be blasted into space as soon as August 2019. Unlike previous robots, DefenseOne.com reports that these will be sent into orbit as crew members on board the Soyuz rocket and not placed into the hold. However, no humans will be on board during the launch.


Docking aborted for Russia's first humanoid robot in space

#artificialintelligence

An unmanned spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot to be sent into orbit failed to dock at the International Space Station on Saturday, in a new setback for Moscow. "Russian cosmonauts issued a command to abort the automated approach of an uncrewed Russian Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station," the US space agency NASA said in a statement. "The craft was unable to lock onto its target at the station," and "backed a safe distance away from the orbital complex while the Russian flight controllers assess the next steps," NASA said. Russian flight controllers had told the ISS crew it appeared the problem that prevented automated docking was in the station and not the Soyuz spacecraft, NASA added. The docking had been scheduled for 0530 GMT but a live broadcast of the event on the website of the Russian space agency Roscosmos was interrupted when the Soyuz approached to about 100 metres (yards) off the ISS.