Meet Dr. Watson: 'Jeopardy!' Champ Takes on Cancer and Land Use

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IBM's Watson may be most famous for winning at the game show "Jeopardy!" In a room at IBM offices, software developers and business customers can query the famous computer and see a demonstration of its work as a research partner in fields ranging from land use to medicine. The room itself has a display wall on one side and a touch screen in the center and near the window. In a recent demonstration of how the machine approaches search queries, Rachel Liddell, a "Watson Experience Leader," used the central touch screen to search through a series of TED talks. As she touched the screen to look up lectures on human psychology, Watson created a set of associated topics, such as "education," and touching one of those words generated more specific topics that appeared in the talk.


The chatbot will see you now: AI may play doctor in the future of healthcare

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A supercomputer whirs away in London, crunching complex drug chemistries into deep learning algorithms to discover new medications. A few miles away, a DeepMind neural network scans millions of images from Moorfields Eye Hospital, searching for signs of eye disease. The application casually asks if you still have that headache from yesterday and if you'd like to book a doctor's appointment for tomorrow. Of all the fields that artificial intelligence will disrupt in the coming years, healthcare may see the greatest paradigm shift. AI's influence in the industry will be deep and broad.


How 3D Printing and IBM Watson Could Replace Doctors

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Health care executives from IBM Watson and Athenahealth athn debated that question onstage at Fortune's inaugural Brainstorm Health conference Tuesday. In addition to partnering with Celgene celg to better track negative drug side effects, IBM ibm is applying its cognitive computing AI technology to recommend cancer treatment in rural areas in the U.S., India, and China, where there is a dearth of oncologists, said Deborah DiSanzo, general manager for IBM Watson Health. For example, IBM Watson could read a patient's electronic medical record, analyze imagery of the cancer, and even look at gene sequencing of the tumor to figure out the optimal treatment plan for a particular person, she said. "That is the promise of AI--not that we are going to replace people, not that we're going to replace doctors, but that we really augment the intelligence and help," DiSanzo said. Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush, however, disagreed.


How 3D Printing and IBM Watson Could Replace Doctors

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Health care executives from IBM Watson and Athenahealth athn debated that question onstage at Fortune's inaugural Brainstorm Health conference Tuesday. In addition to partnering with Celgene celg to better track negative drug side effects, IBM ibm is applying its cognitive computing AI technology to recommend cancer treatment in rural areas in the U.S., India, and China, where there is a dearth of oncologists, said Deborah DiSanzo, general manager for IBM Watson Health. For example, IBM Watson could read a patient's electronic medical record, analyze imagery of the cancer, and even look at gene sequencing of the tumor to figure out the optimal treatment plan for a particular person, she said. "That is the promise of AI--not that we are going to replace people, not that we're going to replace doctors, but that we really augment the intelligence and help," DiSanzo said. Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush, however, disagreed.


Why Doctors Of the Future May Know Code

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On any given day, radiologists at UC San Francisco (UCSF) and across the country view thousands of x-rays. These radiologists, with many years of experience in the medical and research world, have become adept at identifying which images require immediate follow-up or intervention. They can determine, for example, whether the lungs of a trauma patient are collapsed or if there is internal bleeding that requires immediate intervention. But with all of the talk about making healthcare more efficient, the ability of clinicians to read the images and know what they're seeing isn't what's holding back further progress. The challenge is that radiologists only have two eyes and so many hours in a day.