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Nvidia's faster, better GeForce Experience 3.0 launches with mandatory registration

PCWorld

Between the PlayStation 4 Pro reveal and all the iPhone news on Wednesday, Nvidia quietly rolled out a major upgrade of its own. The company pushed out GeForce Experience 3.0 yesterday--a comprehensive redesign of the popular software found on "tens of millions" of GeForce graphics card-equipped PCs, but one sure to rile some nerves at the same time. Let's start with the good stuff first. As you can see in the image below, the interface has been completely revamped, with a strong focus on your installed games. If you yearn for a more information-dense dashboard as opposed to the flashy art, switch from Tiles view to Details view.


The Full Nerd ep. 67: Inside Nvidia's futuristic Turing GPU, GeForce RTX overclocking made easy

PCWorld

We kick things off with more details about Nvidia's radical new Turing architecture, pulling the most pertinent details from Brad's massive Turing GPU deep-dive. What makes it faster in traditional games? How can it handle ray tracing? What the heck are tensor cores? That's followed up by some other GeForce RTX news.


NVIDIA will end 32-bit OS GeForce support this month

Engadget

NVIDIA recently warned that the end was nigh for GeForce support on 32-bit operating systems, and it has now put dates to that event. It will halt GeForce GPU driver support at the end of April, meaning users will lose access to new GeForce Experience features and game ready updates. Moreover, NVIDIA will end security updates by January 2019, so continuing to use your 32-bit OS with a GeForce card beyond that date could actually put it at risk. There's probably still a fair few folks using 32-bit versions of Windows or Linux, despite the fact that a 64-bit version of Windows XP was released on October 25th, 2001. I doubt that many of those are gamers, but there's always that person who only plays certain games "and they run just fine so why should I change?"


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 video review: Behold, the GPU king

Engadget

As far as video card upgrades go, there's a lot to love with NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 1080. We called it "the upgrade you've been waiting for" in our full review. The GTX 1080 blows away last year's high-end cards, and even though it's 599 ( 699 for the Founders Edition we tested), it's well worth the cost for serious gamers. In our video review above, check out some gameplay footage from the new Doom remake, as well as Quantum Break.


Nvidia warns stocks of its GeForce RTX 3090 'BFGPU' will be low

PCWorld

The $700 GeForce RTX 3080, Nvidia's staggeringly powerful flagship gaming card, sold out in seconds when it launched last week, dragging retail sites offline under the strain of the demand. Would-be customers screamed so loudly that in a rare move, Nvidia apologized and promised to beef up anti-bot security on its own site for Founders Edition cards. Well, history could very well repeat itself when the $1,499 GeForce RTX 3090 launches on Thursday, Nvidia warns. "Since we built GeForce RTX 3090 for a unique group of users, like the TITAN RTX before it, we want to apologise upfront that this will be in limited supply on launch day," the company said in a post published Wednesday. "We know this is frustrating, and we're working with our partners to increase the supply in the weeks to come."