'Spider-like senses' could help autonomous machines see better: Researchers are building animal-inspired sensors into the shells of aircraft, cars

#artificialintelligence

They might actually detect and avoid objects better, says Andres Arrieta, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue University, because they would process sensory information faster. Better sensing capabilities would make it possible for drones to navigate in dangerous environments and for cars to prevent accidents caused by human error. Current state-of-the-art sensor technology doesn't process data fast enough -- but nature does. And researchers wouldn't have to create a radioactive spider to give autonomous machines superhero sensing abilities. Instead, Purdue researchers have built sensors inspired by spiders, bats, birds and other animals, whose actual spidey senses are nerve endings linked to special neurons called mechanoreceptors.


Spider webs as computers

Robohub

Spiders are truly amazing creatures. They have evolved over more than 200 million years and can be found in almost every corner of our planet. They are one of the most successful animals. Not less impressive are their webs, highly intricate structures that have been optimised through evolution over approximately 100 million years with the ultimate purpose of catching prey. However, interestingly, the closer you look at spiders' webs the more details you can observe and the structures are much more complicated than one would expect from a simple snare.


Jumping spiders have real spidey sense! Arachnids can 'hear' you moving from across a room

Daily Mail - Science & tech

With their fearsome fangs and rippling legs, spiders strike fear into the hearts of many. Now there's a new reason for arachnophobes to worry – jumping spiders can hear sounds over much greater distances than previously thought. Researchers say the finding offers a new perspective on the auditory world of spiders and that they have a'spidey sense' like comic book hero, Spiderman. With their fearsome fangs and rippling legs, spiders strike fear into the hearts of many. Now there's a new reason for arachnophobes to worry – jumping spiders can hear sounds over much greater distances than previously thought Dr Shamble and Gil Menda of Cornell said that the new findings change scientists' view on the world that spiders live in.


Spiders can hear you walking and talking from across the room

New Scientist

When you arrive home and open the front door or enter your bedroom, the spiders can hear you. It has long been known that spiders can hear sounds via leg hairs that bend in response to vibrations arriving through the air or through solid objects such as floors or walls. But until now, we thought they could only hear airborne vibrations a few centimetres or "spider lengths" away at most. It now seems that this same approach actually lets them hear sounds up to 5 metres away. Gil Menda at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, and his colleagues were studying a type of jumping spider, Phidippus audax, that they assumed relied almost completely on sight and vibrations they can feel through other objects, such as leaves or floorboards.


Can that spider hear a shriek from the other side of the room?

Christian Science Monitor | Science

These arthropods keep an eye out – or eight, in the case of jumping spiders – for predators and prey. They also sense how close another animal is from how its movement vibrates the floor, wall, or web where the spider rests. But arachnids might have another trick up their hairy sleeves: sound. Scientists thought spiders were only able to pick up on noises within just a few feet of their bodies. But new research suggests one species of jumping spider, Phidippus audax, can actually hear sounds from as far away as 10 feet.