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Artificial Intelligence Experts Respond to Elon Musk's Dire Warning for U.S. Governors - D-brief

#artificialintelligence

If you hadn't heard, Elon Musk is worried about the machines. Though that may seem a quixotic stance for the head of multiple tech companies to take, it seems that his proximity to the bleeding edge of technological development has given him the heebie-jeebies when it comes to artificial intelligence. He's shared his fears of AI running amok before, likening it to "summoning the demon," and Musk doubled down on his stance at a meeting of the National Governors Association this weekend, telling state leaders that AI poses an existential threat to humanity. "Until people see robots going down the street killing people, they don't know how to react because it seems so ethereal. AI is a rare case where I think we need to be proactive in regulation instead of reactive.


Artificial Intelligence Experts Respond to Elon Musk's Dire Warning for U.S. Governors - D-brief

#artificialintelligence

If you hadn't heard, Elon Musk is worried about the machines. Though that may seem a quixotic stance for the head of multiple tech companies to take, it seems that his proximity to the bleeding edge of technological development has given him the heebie-jeebies when it comes to artificial intelligence. He's shared his fears of AI running amok before, likening it to "summoning the demon," and Musk doubled down on his stance at a meeting of the National Governors Association this weekend, telling state leaders that AI poses an existential threat to humanity. "Until people see robots going down the street killing people, they don't know how to react because it seems so ethereal. AI is a rare case where I think we need to be proactive in regulation instead of reactive.


THE BEADY EYE SAYS: WE NEED TO BE SUPER CAREFUL WITH AI.

#artificialintelligence

There are a lot of things that can go and have gone wrong throughout history -- earthquakes and wars and plagues and whatnot. The present state of our planet does not have to be highlighted by me in this post but a major change is coming, over unknown timescales but across every segment of society, and the people playing a part in that transition have a huge responsibility and opportunity to shape it for the best. What is triggering this change? Although most of us are unaware of it, AI systems are everywhere, from bank apps that let us deposit checks with a picture, to everyone's favorite Snapchat filter, to our handheld mobile assistants. While many countries' laws are deficient in terms of artificial intelligence ("AI") – which is defined as the simulation of human intelligence processes by computer systems and other machines,should we ignore the risks of any technology and not take precautions?


Frankenstein's paperclips

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AS DOOMSDAY SCENARIOS go, it does not sound terribly frightening. The "paperclip maximiser" is a thought experiment proposed by Nick Bostrom, a philosopher at Oxford University. Imagine an artificial intelligence, he says, which decides to amass as many paperclips as possible. It devotes all its energy to acquiring paperclips, and to improving itself so that it can get paperclips in new ways, while resisting any attempt to divert it from this goal. Eventually it "starts transforming first all of Earth and then increasing portions of space into paperclip manufacturing facilities".


Who is in control of AI? Orange Business Services

#artificialintelligence

There are increasing calls for government oversight of artificial intelligence development. Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to have a huge and positive impact on our world – but, it also brings with it complex issues that we have never had to face as a society before. AI sounds alarm bells for some people, who are frightened that AI will bring about a real threat to humanity, learning our worst traits, intensifying inequalities and triggering weapons of mass destruction. Others believe AI will take people's jobs and discriminate against the vulnerable in society. Kevin Kelly, author and founder executive editor of Wired believes these anxieties are deep rooted because they link our intelligence to our identity, but that they can be overcome.