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Rise of Robot Radiologists

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When Regina Barzilay had a routine mammogram in her early 40s, the image showed a complex array of white splotches in her breast tissue. The marks could be normal, or they could be cancerous--even the best radiologists often struggle to tell the difference. Her doctors decided the spots were not immediately worrisome. In hindsight, she says, "I already had cancer, and they didn't see it." Over the next two years Barzilay underwent a second mammogram, a breast MRI and a biopsy, all of which continued to yield ambiguous or conflicting findings. Ultimately she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, but the path to that diagnosis had been unbelievably frustrating. "How do you do three tests and get three different results?" she wondered.


Debate flares over using AI to detect Covid-19 in lung scans - STAT

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A series of studies, starting as a steady drip and quickening to a deluge, has reported the same core finding amid the global spread of Covid-19: Artificial intelligence could analyze chest images to accurately detect the disease in legions of untested patients. The results promised a ready solution to the shortage of diagnostic testing in the U.S. and some other countries and triggered splashy press releases and a cascade of hopeful headlines. But in recent days, the initial burst of optimism has given way to an intensifying debate over the plausibility of building AI systems during an unprecedented public health emergency. On one side are AI developers and researchers who argue that training and testing methods can, and should, be modified to fit the contours of the crisis; on the other are skeptics who point to flaws in study designs and the limited number of lung scans available from coronavirus patients to train AI algorithms. They also argue that imaging should be used sparingly during the pandemic because of the risk of spreading the infection through contaminated equipment.


DeepMind's new AI can spot breast cancer just as well as your doctor

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One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer throughout their lives. In an effort to help with quicker detection, researchers have trained a deep-learning algorithm to spot breast cancer in screening scans as accurately or better than a radiologist. While still at an early stage, the research could eventually help reduce incorrect results in the US and help alleviate the shortage of radiologists in the UK. As early detection is key to treatment, women over the age of 50 are tested in the US and UK even if they don't show signs of the disease. False negatives, when cancer is present but not spotted, can prove deadly, while false positives can be distressing.


Artificial Intelligence Predicts Death to Help Us Live Longer

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Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Welsh poet Dylan Thomas' famous lines are a passionate plea to fight against the inevitability of death. While the sentiment is poetic, the reality is far more prosaic. We are all going to die someday at a time and place that will likely remain a mystery to us until the very end. Researchers are now applying artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning and computer vision, to predict when someone may die.


Artificial Intelligence Predicts Death to Help Us Live Longer

#artificialintelligence

Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Welsh poet Dylan Thomas' famous lines are a passionate plea to fight against the inevitability of death. While the sentiment is poetic, the reality is far more prosaic. We are all going to die someday at a time and place that will likely remain a mystery to us until the very end. Researchers are now applying artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning and computer vision, to predict when someone may die.