R Users Will Now Inevitably Become Bayesians

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There are several reasons why everyone isn't using Bayesian methods for regression modeling. One reason is that Bayesian modeling requires more thought: you need pesky things like priors, and you can't assume that if a procedure runs without throwing an error that the answers are valid. A second reason is that MCMC sampling -- the bedrock of practical Bayesian modeling -- can be slow compared to closed-form or MLE procedures. A third reason is that existing Bayesian solutions have either been highly-specialized (and thus inflexible), or have required knowing how to use a generalized tool like BUGS, JAGS, or Stan. This third reason has recently been shattered in the R world by not one but two packages: brms and rstanarm.


Will AI replace judges and lawyers?

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Recent advances in Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning provide us with the tools to build predictive models that can be used to unveil patterns driving judicial decisions. This can be useful, for both lawyers and judges, as an assisting tool to rapidly identify cases and extract patterns which lead to certain decisions. This paper presents the first systematic study on predicting the outcome of cases tried by the European Court of Human Rights based solely on textual content. We formulate a binary classification task where the input of our classifiers is the textual content extracted from a case and the target output is the actual judgment as to whether there has been a violation of an article of the convention of human rights. Textual information is represented using contiguous word sequences, i.e.


What Will The Impact Of Machine Learning Be On Economics?

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What will be the impact of machine learning on economics? NEW YORK, NY - MAY 05: Susan Athey speaks at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2014 - Day 1 on May 5, 2014 in New York City. The short answer is that I think it will have an enormous impact; in the early days, as used "off the shelf," but in the longer run econometricians will modify the methods and tailor them so that they meet the needs of social scientists primarily interested in conducting inference about causal effects and estimating the impact of counterfactual policies (that is, things that haven't been tried yet, or what would have happened if a different policy had been used). Examples of questions economists often study are things like the effects of changing prices, or introducing price discrimination, or changing the minimum wage, or evaluating advertising effectiveness. We want to estimate what would happen in the event of a change, or what would have happened if the change hadn't taken place.


What Will The Impact Of Machine Learning Be On Economics?

#artificialintelligence

What will be the impact of machine learning on economics? NEW YORK, NY - MAY 05: Susan Athey speaks at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2014 - Day 1 on May 5, 2014 in New York City. The short answer is that I think it will have an enormous impact; in the early days, as used "off the shelf," but in the longer run econometricians will modify the methods and tailor them so that they meet the needs of social scientists primarily interested in conducting inference about causal effects and estimating the impact of counterfactual policies (that is, things that haven't been tried yet, or what would have happened if a different policy had been used). Examples of questions economists often study are things like the effects of changing prices, or introducing price discrimination, or changing the minimum wage, or evaluating advertising effectiveness. We want to estimate what would happen in the event of a change, or what would have happened if the change hadn't taken place.


Will quantum computing change machine learning?

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Then there are'quantum machine learning algorithms,' developed over the last decade following a breakthrough by Harrow, Hassidim, and Lloyd, which do address problems like clustering, classification, support-vector machines, etc. But these algorithms typically require a bunch of conditions to work: for example, that the data are well-conditioned; that they can be accessed in quantum superposition (for example, using a "quantum RAM") or else computed on the fly; and that the properties of the data one cares about can actually be estimated by measuring the resulting quantum states. And we don't yet know how often those conditions will hold in practical applications---and equally important, in the cases where they do hold, we don't have strong evidence that there couldn't be classical random sampling algorithms with similar performance to the quantum algorithms.