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'Deep Learning' Will Soon Give Us Super-Smart Robots

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Yann LeCun is among those bringing a new level of artificial intelligence to popular internet services from the likes of Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. As the head of AI research at Facebook, LeCun oversees the creation of vast "neural networks" that can recognize photos and respond to everyday human language. And similar work is driving speech recognition on Google's Android phones, instant language translation on Microsoft's Skype service, and so many other online tools that can "learn" over time. Using vast networks of computer processors, these systems approximate the networks of neurons inside the human brain, and in some ways, they can outperform humans themselves. This week in the scientific journal Nature, LeCun--also a professor of computer science at New York University--details the current state of this "deep learning" technology in a paper penned alongside the two other academics most responsible for this movement: University of Toronto professor Geoff Hinton, who's now at Google, and the University of Montreal's Yoshua Bengio.




'Godfather' of deep learning is reimagining AI

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Geoffrey Hinton may be the "godfather" of deep learning, a suddenly hot field of artificial intelligence, or AI – but that doesn't mean he's resting on his algorithms. Hinton, a University Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, recently released two new papers that promise to improve the way machines understand the world through images or video – a technology with applications ranging from self-driving cars to making medical diagnoses. "This is a much more robust way to detect objects than what we have at present," Hinton, who is also a fellow at Google's AI research arm, said today at a tech conference in Toronto. "If you've been in the field for a long time like I have, you know that the neural nets that we use now – there's nothing special about them. We just sort of made them up."


An AI Pioneer Wants His Algorithms to Understand the 'Why'

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In March, Yoshua Bengio received a share of the Turing Award, the highest accolade in computer science, for contributions to the development of deep learning--the technique that triggered a renaissance in artificial intelligence, leading to advances in self-driving cars, real-time speech translation, and facial recognition. Now, Bengio says deep learning needs to be fixed. He believes it won't realize its full potential, and won't deliver a true AI revolution, until it can go beyond pattern recognition and learn more about cause and effect. In other words, he says, deep learning needs to start asking why things happen. The 55-year-old professor at the University of Montreal, who sports bushy gray hair and eyebrows, says deep learning works well in idealized situations but won't come close to replicating human intelligence without being able to reason about causal relationships.