AI, Machine Learning to Reach $47 Billion by 2020

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According to the IBM Institute of Business Value (IBV), cognitive solutions are already seeing widespread adoption in other industries. Yet the security community is still in the early stages of pioneering cognitive security systems. Today, only 7% of security professionals claim to be using cognitive technologies--and a lack of internal skills in the area and competency are the main obstacles, both cited by 45% of respondents. That said, 21% said their organizations plan to use these solutions in the next two to three years--meaning that the use of cognitive security is set to triple within the next few years. Ironically, the staffing challenge is also a driver: "The 24/7 nature of security operations presents a challenge that is costly for most organizations to staff, which is where the appeal of cognitive-enabled security comes in--it never sleeps or fatigues," said Michael Pinch, CISO, University of Rochester, in the report.


Giving cyber security a voice: IBM's Watson - Information Age

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Watson, IBM's AI supercomputer, now has the ability to investigate security events and create new services for building cognitive security operation centres. And it now has the capability to allow customers and analysts to interact with Watson through voice and chat regarding cyber security concerns. According to IBM, Watson can now help security analysts parse thousands of natural language research reports that have never before been accessible to modern security tools. For the past year, Watson has been trained on the language of cyber security with over one million security documents, and has been tested with over 40 clients and channel partners including the Ireland based partner Smarttech and Avnet. IBM claims it is the industry's first augmented intelligence technology designed to power cognitive security operations centers (SOCs).


AI, Machine Learning to Reach $47 Billion by 2020

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Cognitive systems are driving $8 billion in revenue in 2016--and the space, which includes artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, is slated to become a $47 billion industry by 2020. According to the IBM Institute of Business Value (IBV), cognitive solutions are already seeing widespread adoption in other industries. Yet the security community is still in the early stages of pioneering cognitive security systems. Today, only 7% of security professionals claim to be using cognitive technologies--and a lack of internal skills in the area and competency are the main obstacles, both cited by 45% of respondents. That said, 21% said their organizations plan to use these solutions in the next two to three years--meaning that the use of cognitive security is set to triple within the next few years.


The role of AI in Security: Exclusive Interview Vaidyanathan Iyer, IBM India

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In a candid interaction with PCQUEST, Vaidyanathan Iyer, Security Software Leader, IBM Indian South/ Asia talked about the role of AI in security and its landscape in India. The security landscape in India- Why is it no longer a boardroom discussion alone? As per a 2018 IBM Ponemon study, the average mean time to identify a data breach in India increased from 170 days from the previous year to 188 days. 'Malicious or criminal attacks' took 219 days on an average to be identified. The report further highlighted that the average mean time to contain a data breach in India increased from 72 days from the previous year to 78 days.


Why Cybersecurity Needs a Human in the Loop

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A typical cybersecurity analyst is never short of work, a lot of which can be futile. According to a 2015 Ponemon Institute study, by the end of the year the average security operations center has spent around 20,000 hours just on chasing alerts that prove to be false alarms. Traditional security systems generate a lot of noise that needs to be waded through, which creates even more work. At the same time, a vast pool of security information is published across multiple media in natural languages that can't be quickly processed and leveraged by these systems. Cognitive security, or artificial intelligence, can "understand" natural language, and is a logical and necessary next step to take advantage of this increasingly massive corpus of intelligence that exists.