Silicon Valley In 2016: A New World Order Begins To Arise

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Why Samsung May Release A Foldable Smartphone Next Year -- Even If It Won't Make Them Any Money By all accounts, 2016 has been an extraordinary year for Silicon Valley. Not only have the technology behemoths mustered a growing influence on Capitol Hill, their sheer market capitalization also testifies to one undeniable fact: They are the ones who change the world. The tech industry's missions are unapologetic and filled with passion. Their corporate myths are often wrapped up in their early days as startups. That some awkward twenty-year-old could turn their social ineptness into their biggest advantage and build a global enterprise from their garage is the highest expression of the American dream.


2016 In Review: A New World Order From The Silicon Valley

Forbes - Tech

By all accounts, 2016 has been an extraordinary year for Silicon Valley. Not only have the technology behemoths mustered a growing influence on Capitol Hill, their sheer market capitalization also testifies to one undeniable fact: They are the ones who change the world. The tech industry's missions are unapologetic and filled with passion. Their corporate myths are often wrapped up in their early days as startups. That some awkward twenty-year-old could turn their social ineptness into their biggest advantage and build a global enterprise from their garage is the highest expression of the American dream.


Google sets the bar high for its Oct. phone reveal

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Google has helped build intense speculation for its October 4 event in San Francisco, where it's expected to reveal new phones aimed at consumers that will power a new virtual reality platform, and possibly other smart home devices. Now that the buzz has reached a football-stadium roar, here comes the hard part: living up to the hype. Google has been teasing the event as one for the history books. A tweet Monday from Hiroshi Lockheimer, the company's senior vice president of Android, Chrome OS and Google Play, turned up the volume on the buzz. We announced the 1st version of Android 8 years ago today.


At CES 2017, Alexa, paper-thin TVs were early stars

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Columnist Jennifer Jolly tries out Alexa on the Ford, peers at TVs held to walls by magnets, and tests a'smart bike'. There's the equivalent of some 43-football fields worth of space filled with gadgets at CES 2017. With that many tech toys to explore, they all start to blur together pretty quickly. Here's what I've seen so far that's made an impression. Ford is making it all possible with its SYNC 3 AppLink software, so you can use Alexa's voice commands to ask for directions, get a rundown of the top headlines, add milk to your shopping list, or catch the latest New York Times bestseller via audiobook.


Pokemon Go and IBM Watson IoT

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This weekend saw Michael Hsu, a front-end and back-end developer, and part-time university lecturer in California, win the Best use of Watson award at the AT&T Shape Hackathon in San Francisco. Michael won the hackathon with his app focused on the Pokémon Go game. The game, using augmented reality and GPS, allows players to capture, battle, and train virtual creatures, called Pokémon, who appear on device screens as though in the real world. In this video you can see Michael, using IBM's Watson IoT platform and the Watson Visual Recognition service to take periodical screenshots, identify the Pokemon characters in them, and alert other users to where the characters are.