Goto

Collaborating Authors

UK carbon emissions drop to lowest level since 19th century, study finds

The Guardian > Energy

The UK's carbon dioxide emissions have fallen to their lowest level since the 19th century as coal use continues to plummet, analysis suggests. Emissions of the major greenhouse gas fell almost 6% year-on-year in 2016, after the use of coal for electricity more than halved to record lows, according to the Carbon Brief website, which reports on climate science and energy policy. The assessment suggests carbon emissions in 2016 were about 381m tonnes, putting the UK's carbon pollution at its lowest level – apart from during coal mining disputes in the 1920s – since 1894. Carbon emissions in 2016 are about 36% below the reference year of 1990, against which legal targets to cut climate pollution are measured. Emissions of carbon dioxide from coal fell 50% in 2016 as use of the fossil fuel dropped by 52%, contributing to an overall drop in carbon output of 5.8% last year compared with 2015, Carbon Brief said.


UK's CO2 emissions lowest since 19th century as coal use falls

New Scientist

The UK's carbon dioxide emissions have fallen to their lowest level since the 19th century as coal use continues to plummet, analysis suggests. Emissions of the major greenhouse gas fell almost 6 per cent year-on-year in 2016, after the use of coal for electricity more than halved to record lows, according to the Carbon Brief website, which reports on climate science and energy policy. The assessment suggests carbon emissions in 2016 were around 381 million tonnes, putting the UK's carbon pollution at its lowest level – apart from during coal mining disputes in the 1920s – since 1894. Carbon emissions in 2016 are around 36 per cent below the reference year of 1990, against which legal targets to cut climate pollution are measured. Emissions of carbon dioxide from coal fell 50 per cent in 2016 as use of the fossil fuel dropped by 52 per cent, contributing to an overall drop in carbon output of 5.8 per cent last year compared with 2015, Carbon Brief said.


In climate push, Microsoft to erase its carbon footprint from atmosphere

The Japan Times

NEW YORK – Microsoft Corp. said on Thursday it aims to remove more carbon from the atmosphere than it emits by 2030 and that by 2050, it hopes to have taken out enough to account for all the direct emissions the company has ever made. The focus on removing existing carbon from the atmosphere sets Microsoft's climate goals apart from other corporate pledges, which have focused on cutting ongoing emissions or preventing future ones. Speaking from a stage at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond, Washington, Chief Executive Satya Nadella said that corporations need to create profitable solutions for the problems of both people and the planet. "If the last decade has taught us anything, it's that technology built without these principles can do more harm than good," he said. "We must begin to offset the damaging effects of climate change," he said, adding if global temperatures continue to rise unabated "the results will be devastating."


Abandoning nuclear power plans 'would push up carbon emissions'

The Guardian > Energy

Abandoning the UK's ambitions for a number of new nuclear power stations would cause carbon emissions to spike and push up energy costs, according to lobbyists led by a former Tory MP. The New Nuclear Watch Institute warned against what it called the "folly of technological tribalism" of pursuing a future powered by renewables and gas-fired power stations, rather than any new nuclear plants. Excluding nuclear would cause the UK to emit millions of extra tonnes of carbon dioxide and put the country's carbon targets out of reach, the group concluded in a report due to be published on Thursday. Tim Yeo, the institute's chairman, said: "Abandoning nuclear power leads unavoidably to a very big increase in carbon emissions, which will prevent Britain from meeting its legally-binding climate change commitments. It also raises the cost of electricity."


Massive amounts of carbon dioxide could leak from the soil by mid-century, study finds

PBS NewsHour

Loss of carbon in soil, and resulting increases in carbon dioxide, is one result of global warming. The words "climate change" tend to invoke images of heat and storms and smog-filled air. But one of the greatest global warming risks may start in the ground. A team of 50 scientists throughout the world spent more than 25 years studying soil carbon loss and its connection to climate change. Their work, published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, shows that global warming will lead to the loss of about 120 trillion pounds of carbon by mid-century.