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Court revives claim involving uranium mine near Grand Canyon

FOX News

An Obama-era decision prohibits new mining claims on roughly 1,562 square miles outside the boundaries of the national park through 2032. But that doesn't keep uranium companies with grandfathered claims from developing them. The U.S. Forest Service concluded in 2012 that Energy Fuels Inc. has a valid, existing right to mine near Tusayan, the gateway town to the Grand Canyon's South Rim entrance. The company is waiting for uranium prices to rebound before reopening the Canyon Mine. Environmental groups and the Havasupai Tribe challenged the Forest Service's determination in a lawsuit against the agency and Energy Fuels.


Grijalva to Push for Permanent Ban on New Mining Claims

U.S. News

Arizona Congressman Raul Grijalva, fifth from right, with tribal leaders and supporters of the Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act, from left, Sarana Riggs, representing a coalition of environmental groups, Flagstaff Mayor Coral Evans, Carletta Tilousi of Havasupai Tribal Council, unidentified man, Matthew Putesoy and Claudius Putesoy of the Havasupai Tribal Council, Ethan Aumack, Executive Director, Grand Canyon Trust, back, Brad Powell, front, President, Arizona Wildlife Federation, Richard Powskey of the Hualapai Tribal Council, and an unidentified woman pose for a photo Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019, at the South Rim, in Grand Canyon National Park, Ariz. Grijalva is pushing to make a temporary ban on the filing of new mining claims in the Grand Canyon region permanent.


Court keeps ban on new mining claims around Grand Canyon in uranium-rich reserves

The Japan Times

FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA – A U.S. appeals court has kept in place an Obama administration ban on new mining claims around the Grand Canyon.


Trump says he will not impose uranium import quotas

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - U.S. President Donald Trump says he will not impose quotas on importing uranium, backing away from a possible trade confrontation and breaking with a Commerce Department assessment that America's use of foreign uranium raises national security concerns. The decision is unusual for Trump, who has pointed to national security concerns in calling for restrictions on foreign metal and autos in trade negotiations. It is also drawing rare criticism from Republicans in energy-rich states. Uranium is a vital component for the U.S. nuclear arsenal, submarines and power plants, which prompted a monthslong Commerce Department investigation into whether such materials fall under the national security umbrella. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has said that just 5 percent of the uranium the U.S. needs for military and electricity generation comes from domestic production.


U.S. nuclear power and uranium mining industries hope for Trump bailout

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – A plea from uranium mining companies and nuclear power plant operators for tax breaks and other federal financial boosts is going before President Donald Trump, as his administration studies reviving the U.S. uranium industry in the name of national security. Trump is scheduled to receive recommendations Thursday from a task force of national security, military and other federal officials about ways to revive U.S. uranium mining, which has lagged against global competition amid low uranium ore prices. Uranium is a vital component for the country's nuclear arsenal, submarines and nuclear power plants. U.S. uranium users get about 10 percent of their supply from domestic sources, the federal Energy Information Administration has said. Most of the rest comes from Canada and Australia, followed by Russia and former Soviet republics.