How Big Data Can Use Language To Find The Hidden Reason To Sell A Stock

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Traders and financial professionals work at the opening bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). It's no secret on Wall Street that a "sell" recommendation in sell-side research reports is exceedingly rare, and it can't be chalked up to today's bull market recently surpassing its ninth birthday. According to FactSet data, only 6% of analyst recommendations on S&P 500 companies are "sell" ratings or the equivalent, lending credence to the notion that conflicts of interest persist despite reform efforts to make recommendations more objective in nature. Put simply, negative recommendations can place an analyst in the virtual penalty box when it comes to getting access to companies, and the effects are clear in a business where access is king. So, is there still use to looking through research reports to figure out which stocks are worth buying and selling?


Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Autonomous 'Hands-Free' Banking

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They may have no choice, if they wish to survive. Consumers, accustomed to experiences with Amazon, Netflix, and Starbucks, demand rapid fulfillment of requests, personalized solutions, and constant attention from their financial providers. With the wealth of data possessed by banks and credit unions, consumers not surprisingly expect providers to know them, value them, and reward them for their relationships. Given the rise of digital and challenger banks, traditional banks and credit unions must find new ways to maintain their share-of-wallet and customer trust. Technologies that integrate artificial intelligence and big data analytics provide financial institutions with unprecedented visibility into their customers' financial dynamics, enabling the kind of personalized service which they crave.


Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Autonomous 'Hands-Free' Banking

#artificialintelligence

They may have no choice, if they wish to survive. Consumers, accustomed to experiences with Amazon, Netflix, and Starbucks, demand rapid fulfillment of requests, personalized solutions, and constant attention from their financial providers. With the wealth of data possessed by banks and credit unions, consumers not surprisingly expect providers to know them, value them, and reward them for their relationships. Given the rise of digital and challenger banks, traditional banks and credit unions must find new ways to maintain their share-of-wallet and customer trust. Technologies that integrate artificial intelligence and big data analytics provide financial institutions with unprecedented visibility into their customers' financial dynamics, enabling the kind of personalized service which they crave.


4 disruptions AI could cause in healthcare: Within the next decade, healthcare will see emerging technologies including artificial intelligence, cloud computing, predictive analytics and blockchain spurring billions of dollars in value increases, according to a new McKinsey & Company report on this tech-driven

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Within the next decade, healthcare will see emerging technologies including artificial intelligence, cloud computing, predictive analytics and blockchain spurring billions of dollars in value increases, according to a new McKinsey & Company report on this tech-driven "era of exponential growth." For these innovations to impact areas like clinical productivity, care delivery and waste reduction, though, certain value pools will need to be disrupted across the entire industry. Here are four possible disruptive changes that could transform healthcare in the coming years, according to McKinsey. More articles about AI: How AI can enhance clinical productivity IBM Research using self-driving car tech to promote seniors' wellbeing Bill calls for $2.2B in federal AI funding


AI and the Next Recession - InformationWeek

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Recent reports of strong job growth in the US suggest the economy may currently be at "peak employment." That fact has made the widely-publicized concerns over the impact of automation and artificial intelligence on jobs seem overblown and out of step with the times. Yet, the clouds of the next economic contraction are gathering. Some economists and executives believe a recession could come as early as this year while others expect it's another year or two out. Rana Foroohar, a global business columnist and an associate editor at the Financial Times, recently stated on CNN that more than half of CFOs at large U.S. companies expect a recession in the next year.