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Facial recognition software can sense when a sheep is in pain

Engadget

Animals can't tell us when they're in pain, so owners and veterinarians have to rely on other cues to help treat animals in discomfort. But determining that amount of pain might have just gotten easier: Researchers at the University of Cambridge used facial recognition software to figure out the amount of pain a sheep is in simply by looking at it. When a sheep is hurting, it makes certain predictable facial expressions. It's so reliable, in fact, that scientists recently introduced the Sheep Pain Facial Expression Scale (SPFES) to easily determine the amount of pain a sheep feels. However, training humans to read these facial expressions and tics is time consuming; that's where the computer comes in.


Best Facial Recognition Software

#artificialintelligence

Facial recognition is a software application that creates numerical representations by analyzing images of human faces, in order to compare against other human faces and identify or verify a person's identity. From checkout-free or thief prevention at retail stores to helping identify missing or exploited children or victims of human trafficking, facial recognition is transforming industries by serving different purposes. According to a report, the current facial recognition market is estimated at $3.2 billion and is expected to grow to $7 billion in revenue by 2024 at a CAGR of 16%.


Amazon Says It Can Detect Fear on Your Face. You Scared?

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Amazon announced a breakthrough from its AI experts Monday: Their algorithms can now read fear on your face, at a cost of $0.001 per image--or less if you process more than 1 million images. The news sparked interest because Amazon is at the center of a political tussle over the accuracy and regulation of facial recognition. Amazon sells a facial-recognition service, part of a suite of image-analysis features called Rekognition, to customers that include police departments. Another Rekognition service tries to discern the gender of faces in photos. The company said Monday that the gender feature had been improved--apparently a response to research showing it was much less accurate for people with darker skin.


Details emerge of King's Cross facial-ID tech

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King's Cross Central's developers said they wanted facial-recognition software to spot people on the site who had previously committed an offence there. The detail has emerged in a letter one of its managers sent to the London mayor, on 14 August. Sadiq Khan had sought reassurance using facial recognition on the site was legal. Two days before, Argent indicated it was using it to "ensure public safety". On Monday, it said it had now scrapped work on new uses of the technology.


Facial recognition is tech so special it should be banned

#artificialintelligence

In the 15th century, an insidious scourge stalked Europe. It threatened to put people out of work, ruin their brains, and even take them further away from God. According to Abbot Johannes Trithemius, it was the printing press. Now, of course, the printing press and its many effects are seen as not just good, but foundational to modern societies -- despite the fact that the printing press was also used to produce the Adolf Hitler manifesto "Mein Kampf." But this is how we tend to deal with technology: as an often-ambivalent thing around which we work to highlight the positive and mitigate the negative.