Plastic microbead ban: What impact will it have?

BBC News

A UK-wide prohibition on the use of plastic microbeads in the manufacture of some cosmetic and personal care products has come into effect.


Ban on plastic microbeads comes into force in the UK

New Scientist

A UK-wide ban on the manufacture of cosmetics and care products containing tiny pieces of plastic known as "microbeads" has come into force. The move is aimed at protecting the marine environment from one source of plastic pollution, as microbeads are washed down the drain and can enter the seas and be swallowed by fish and crustaceans with potentially harmful effects. Manufacturers of cosmetics and personal care products will no longer be able to add the tiny plastic pieces to rinse-off toiletries such as face scrubs, toothpastes and shower gels. The ban on the manufacture of products containing microbeads will be followed by a ban on the sale of such products in July. A report in 2016 found that more than a third of fish in the English Channel are contaminated with microscopic plastic debris from exfoliating skin scrubs, synthetic fabrics and other everyday products.


This #1 best-selling hair dryer is actually a brush—and it's amazing

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

As someone with curly but fine strands, I've struggled to style my hair--especially straighten it--without singing it. While that sounds dramatic, it's true: I've spent years fighting my cowlicks with a myriad of blow dryers, flatirons, and straightening brushes with little success. What's more, because it's oh so thin, my hair breaks tremendously easily with any heat--especially when I'm fighting against my Jewish curl patterns as hard as I tend to. So when I stumbled upon the Revlon One-Step Volumizer Hair Dryer ($60), it seemed almost too good to be true. Not only do many reviewers swear it cuts drying time in half, many also have since ditched other heat styling tools, no matter how well loved, since they leave hair flattened--exactly what this dryer promises not to do by lifting at the roots for bouncy, full hair.


Robot room service is coming to US hotels

AITopics Original Links

The next time you call room service for extra towels, your order may be delivered by a robot. It might not be able to change your sheets, but Savioke's Relay hospitality robot can bring everything from toothpaste to Starbucks, and it uses Wi-Fi and 3D cameras to navigate. The robot is already being used by some hotels in the US, and with recent funding of $15 million, autonomous butlers could soon become a lot more popular. The next time you call room service for a new tube of toothpaste, your order may be delivered by a robot. It might not be able to change your sheets, but Savioke's Relay hospitality robot can bring everything from clean towels to Starbucks, and it uses Wi-Fi and 3D cameras to navigate Each of the Relay robots stands roughly three feet tall.