Growing up in a male dominated environment can make you a SUPERMAN

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Males who evolve in male-dominated populations become far better at securing females than those who grow up in monogamous populations, researchers have claimed. They say fruit flies who evolved in polyandrous populations, where sexual competition was fierce, are much more likely to outcompete the other males and successfully mate. This led to the emergence of'supermen' within the group. Males who evolve in male-dominated populations become far better at securing females, turning into'super males' than those who grow up in monogamous populations, Sheffield researchers found. The scientists discovered that males who evolved in polyandrous populations, where sexual competition was fierce, are much more likely to outcompete the other males and successfully mate, regardless of the population the female comes from.


Dance flies attract males with their hairy legs and inflatable sacs

New Scientist

Female dance flies with large inflatable sacs and hairy legs are more attractive to males. Dance flies get their name because they form aerial mating swarms and seem to dance together in the air. It looks simple and beautiful, but it turns out to be as complex as any ceilidh. Rosalind Murray at the University of Toronto Mississauga and her colleagues have now revealed the lengths to which females of the species Rhamphomyia longicauda go to attract a mate at these dances. Before they enter a swarm, females swallow air to inflate sacs along their abdomen to make their bodies look bigger.


Female fruit flies become violent after sex

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The female of the species may be more deadly than the male - but it's the male's fault, according to a new study. Scientists studying fruit flies found females became more violent after mating. They put this down to chemicals found in the semen that carries a male's DNA in his swimming sperm cells. It's known seminal fluid proteins transferred from males during intercourse can change women's behaviour - including eating and sleeping patterns. Although they investigated fruit flies the findings could in principle be applied to responses in many animals - including humans - where sperm and semen is released inside the female's body during sex.


Little fruit flies, big sperm

FOX News

Picky females have driven the evolution of mega sperm in males as a way to ensure that the gals will get only the best mates, new research finds. Tiny fruit flies have record-breaking sperm cells. The sperm of Drosophila bifurca can reach lengths of 2.3 inches (5.8 centimeters), for example. Researchers have long known that the peculiarities of the female fruit fly's reproductive tract are responsible for these enormous sperm, which take a huge amount of energy to produce. Female fruit flies have a sperm-storage organ in which they hold sperm from multiple matings.


Fruit fly study reveals why humans need personal space

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists have learned about humans' needs for personal space from a surprising source - fruit flies. Little was known about the mechanisms that allow us to determine when someone is'too near' or'too far,' but researchers just discovered it all has to do with dopamine - the neurotransmitter that controls pleasure and reward. They say this could have important implications for understanding people who are autistic, or have schizophrenia or other conditions. Scientists have learned about humans' needs for personal space from a surprising source - fruit flies. Little was known about the mechanisms that allow us to determine when someone is'too near' or'too far,' but researchers just discovered it all has to do with dopamine The team found that levels of dopamine can change how much space fruit flies need from each other.