Coolio arrested at LAX on suspicion of possessing stolen, loaded gun, police say

Los Angeles Times

Police arrested the rapper Coolio on Saturday after authorities said they found a loaded, stolen firearm in his carry-on bag at a security checkpoint inside Los Angeles International Airport. Around 10:50 a.m., airport police responded to Terminal 3 after receiving a report about a prohibited item in the screening area, spokeswoman Alicia Hernandez said in a statement. Police took possession of a carry -on bag on the X -ray screening belt and detained a 39-year-old man who claimed the bag, Hernandez said. Authorities soon discovered that the bag "contained items belonging to one of the suspect's traveling companions," who had left the screening area and boarded a departing plane, Hernandez said. Police then detained Coolio, 53, "who upon questioning claimed ownership and possession of the carry -on bag," Hernandez said.


Airbus Aerial Provides a Whole New View of the World

WIRED

You may know Airbus as that Boeing competitor that also makes planes, but the European company is in fact an defense and aerospace giant that makes helicopters, satellites, and drones, and now it's using its aircraft not just to move people, but to give those on the ground a whole new view from the skies. A year-old effort called Airbus Aerial will seek to serve climate modelers, farmers, city planners, engineers, first responders, and anybody else who needs a a particular view of the world. The company combines data from observation satellites (of which Airbus is the largest global operator), manned planes with cameras slung underneath, and drones, to get to the places others can't reach. Airbus Aerial packages it all up, and presents it neatly to the customer, via a cloud-based interface. "It's a very complex thing to just say'I need satellite data'," says Jesse Kallman, president of the company.


The airports of the future are here

Mashable

No matter how well-regarded a particular airport happens to be, the slog from curb to cabin is pretty much the same wherever you go. A decades-old paradigm of queues, security screens, snack vendors, and gate-waiting prevails--the only difference is the level of stress. Transiting a modern hub such as Munich or Seoul is more easily endured than threading your way through the perpetual construction zones that pass for airports around New York. The sky portal of the 2040s, however, is likely to be free of such delights. Many of us will be driven to the terminal by autonomous cars; our eyes, faces, and fingers will be scanned; and our bags will have a permanent ID that allows them to be whisked from our homes before we even set out.


Robots and AI – the technology coming to airports will blow your mind

#artificialintelligence

Perhaps you've bumped into Mildred, Carla or Oscar on your recent travels. They're not real people but avatars of chatbots – concocted by Lufthansa, Avianca and Air New Zealand respectively – or artificial intelligence (AI) powered computer programs accessed on your smartphone that enable you to have a simulated conversation of sorts. Now airports are getting in on the act, and it's all part of a paradigm shift towards self-service and interactions with technologies that offer "personal" information to help us on our way through the terminal. It's a shift confirmed in the findings of the Passenger IT Trends Survey released by Sita, the provider of much of the digital infrastructure that underpins airport and airline communications and operations worldwide. The survey found that face-to-face check-in is now down to 46 per cent of passengers, and since last year's survey, self-service bag-tagging has risen from 31 per cent to 47 per cent.


BMW's autonomous concept car of the future was cool, I guess

Mashable

As I approached San Francisco International Airport, my expectations for BMW's new concept car were as big as the looming Boeing 777F Lufthansa cargo jet waiting for me. I had surrendered my cellphone and everything in my purse but my drivers license to see BMW's iNext vehicle. Its tour started in Munich a few days earlier; it came to the Bay Area after a stop at New York's JFK airport, and was scheduled to continue on to Beijing. SEE ALSO: BMW makes sure we can't escape voice assistants while driving After passing a final security check, I climbed up the rickety staircase with fellow media members and entered the cavernous aircraft. We had been told very little about what we were going to see, except it was not only the "car of the future" but the "idea of the future."