Artificial Intelligence Advances Threaten Privacy of Health Data

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Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, a new study shows. Led by University of California Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal. The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.


Advances in artificial intelligence threaten privacy of people's health data

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, study shows. Led by UC Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal. The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.


Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, study shows. Led by UC Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal. The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.


Improvements in AI increase the Risks of Health Data Privacy Issues. – RtoZ.Org – Latest Technology News

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has started playing important role in Healthcare. For Example, an AI system is used to improve early breast cancer detection. Another AI system improves the performance of the Microscope to find cancer cells more efficiently. And, the AI is getting powerful steadily. An AI Algorithm can see and learn to analyze millions of publicly available images on Google Street View to determine the political leanings of a given neighborhood just by looking at the cars on the streets.


Advances in AI threaten health data privacy: Study

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) have created new threats to the privacy of health data, a study has found. The study, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research led by professor Anil Aswani from the University of California -- Berkeley in the US, shows that by using AI, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data like that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering over 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked. "We wanted to use NHANES (the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) to look at privacy questions because this data is representative of the diverse population in the US," Aswani said.