Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, study shows. Led by UC Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal. The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.


Advancement of artificial intelligence opens health data privacy to attack

#artificialintelligence

Improvements in artificial intelligence hold the potential to put personal health data at risk, a new study shows. Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of health data, a new UC Berkeley study shows. The study, led by professor Anil Aswani of the Industrial Engineering & Operations Research Department (IEOR) in the College of Engineering and his team, suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was released today on JAMA Network Open. In the work, which was funded in part by UC Berkeley's Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, Aswani shows that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data (like that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones) and correlating it to demographic data.


Advances in artificial intelligence threaten privacy of people's health data

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, study shows. Led by UC Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal. The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.


Artificial Intelligence Advances Threaten Privacy of Health Data

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) have created new threats to the privacy of people's health data, a new University of California, Berkeley, a new study shows. Led by University of California Berkeley engineer Anil Aswani, the study suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development. The research was published Dec. 21 in the JAMA Network Open journal. The findings show that by using artificial intelligence, it is possible to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data, such as that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches and smartphones, and correlating it to demographic data. The mining of two years' worth of data covering more than 15,000 Americans led to the conclusion that the privacy standards associated with 1996's HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation need to be revisited and reworked.


Berkeley provost criticized for lax discipline resigns post

U.S. News

The University of California, Berkeley's second-highest ranking administrator -- who had faced criticism for allegedly being too lenient on a fellow administrator accused of sexual harassment -- resigned from his post on Friday, citing personal reasons. Claude Steele, a prominent social psychologist who became the top academic officer at Berkeley two years ago, said in a statement he was stepping down as provost and executive vice chancellor because his wife has serious health problems that preclude him from devoting himself to the job. "The choice has thus become clear: I can no longer offer UC Berkeley the time and level of commitment it needs from its (provost), while at the same time being a part of my family in the way I want to be," Steele said. Steele, 70, became a target of angry faculty and students last month after the executive assistant to the dean of Berkeley's law school revealed in a lawsuit that her boss had violated university sexual harassment policy by kissing, hugging and touching her repeatedly, but received from the provost only a temporary pay cut and orders to undergo counseling as punishment. The dean, Sujit Choudhry, resigned several days later amid mounting faculty outrage that he had been allowed to remain as dean after a campus investigation substantiated his assistant's sexual harassment allegations.