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Poker pros are latest losers in battle of man versus machine

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The latest battle between man and machine is being played out on the poker tables of a Pennsylvania casino, and so far humanity is losing. An artificial intelligence computer program called Liberatus has accumulated winnings of almost $800,000 against a team of professional poker players at the Brain Vs. Liberatus, developed by Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science, is aiming to be the first computer program to win a professional poker tournament--a game considered by many AI researchers to be one of the hardest for computers to beat humans at. Artificial intelligence advances in recent years have seen computers master and eventually outperform the best human players at games including Chess and the game show Jeopardy!. In 2016, researchers at Google's DeepMind developed a system that was able to beat champion Go player Lee Sedol--a significant step for artificial intelligence.


Bot makes poker pros fold: What's next for AI?

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Carnegie Mellon's No-Limit Texas Hold'em software made short work of four of the world's best professional poker players in Pittsburgh at the grueling "Brains vs. Artificial Intelligence" poker tournament. Poker now joins chess, Jeopardy, go, and many other games at which programs outplay people. But poker is different from all the others in one big way: players have to guess based on partial, or "imperfect" information. "Chess and Go are games of perfect information," explains Libratus co-creator Noam Brown, a Ph.D. candidate at Carnegie Mellon. "All the information in the game is available for both sides to see.


AI just beat the world's 4 best poker players: What it means - TechRepublic

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The Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh may not seem a likely setting for a major scientific breakthrough. But on Tuesday, it was: Libratus, an AI system developed by Carnegie Mellon University, beat the world's top four human players in a 20-day tournament of Head's-Up No-Limit Texas Hold'em poker. Libratus, developed by Carnegie Mellon's Tuomas Sandholm, a professor of computer science, and Noam Brown, a Ph.D. student in computer science, competed against Dong Kim, Jimmy Chou, Daniel McAulay, and Jason Les in a competition called "Brains Vs. Artificial Intelligence: Upping the Ante"--during which 120,000 hands were played. "This is the last frontier," said Sandholm during a press conference on Tuesday.


Why It Matters That Human Poker Pros Are Getting Trounced By an AI

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Artificial Intelligence" Texas Hold'em Poker tournament, and a machine named Libratus is trouncing a quartet of professional human players. Should the machine maintain its substantial lead--currently at $701,242--it will be considered a major milestone in the history of AI. Given the early results, it appears that we'll soon be able to add Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold'em poker (HUNL) to the list of games where AI has surpassed the best humans--a growing list that includes Othello, chess, checkers, Jeopardy!, and as we witnessed last year, Go. Unlike chess and Go, however, this popular version of poker involves bluffing, hidden cards, and imperfect information, which machines find notoriously difficult to handle. Computer scientists say HUNL represents the "last frontier" of game solving, signifying a milestone in the development of AI--and an achievement that would represent a major step towards more human-like intelligence.


Why It Matters That Human Poker Pros Are Getting Trounced By an AI

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence" Texas Hold'em Poker tournament, and a machine named Libratus is trouncing a quartet of professional human players. Should the machine maintain its substantial lead--currently at $701,242--it will be considered a major milestone in the history of AI. Given the early results, it appears that we'll soon be able to add Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold'em poker (HUNL) to the list of games where AI has surpassed the best humans--a growing list that includes Othello, chess, checkers, Jeopardy!, and as we witnessed last year, Go. Unlike chess and Go, however, this popular version of poker involves bluffing, hidden cards, and imperfect information, which machines find notoriously difficult to handle. Computer scientists say HUNL represents the "last frontier" of game solving, signifying a milestone in the development of AI--and an achievement that would represent a major step towards more human-like intelligence.