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Nissan to withdraw from diesel vehicle market in Europe

The Japan Times

Nissan Motor Co. has decided to exit the diesel-powered vehicle market in Europe, according to sources. The Japanese automaker made the decision in light of strict environmental regulations in Europe, and aims to focus its resources on the development of electric vehicles, the sources said Sunday. Among other Japanese carmakers, Toyota Motor Corp. is not planning to launch new models of diesel-powered vehicles except for trucks. Subaru Corp. has also decided to withdraw from diesel car sales in Europe as well as Australia around fiscal 2020. Nissan currently sells a wide range of diesel models in Europe including SUVs.


Nissan to withdraw from diesel vehicle market in Europe

The Japan Times

Nissan Motor Co. has decided to exit the diesel-powered vehicle market in Europe, sources said Sunday. The Japanese automaker made the decision in light of strict environmental regulations in Europe and aims to focus its resources on the development of electric vehicles, the sources said. Among Japanese carmakers, Toyota Motor Corp. is not planning to launch new models of diesel-powered vehicles except for trucks. Subaru Corp. has also decided to withdraw from diesel car sales in Europe as well as Australia around fiscal 2020. Nissan has a wide range of diesel models in Europe including SUVs.


Diesel cars: Why are sales falling?

BBC News

Diesel car sales fell by 37% this March compared with March 2017, according to the latest figures from the industry body the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). This was the latest in a series of falls in new diesel car sales. In 2017, demand for new diesel cars plunged by 17%. With diesel car sales dropping and updates to taxes for older diesel vehicles coming into force in April, BBC News answers the top five questions about diesel. According to the SMMT, 153,594 new diesel cars were registered in March 2018, down from 244,593 a year before.


Diesel ban approved for German cities to cut pollution

BBC News

German cities will be allowed to ban older diesel vehicles from some areas following a landmark court ruling.


Diesel drivers could be charged up to £20 DAILY across UK

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Diesel drivers could face up to £20-a-day'toxin taxes# in 35 cities across England as the Government cracks down on vehicles that cause air pollution. Private diesel cars and commercial vehicles could face bans in peak hours and daily charges to discourage drivers from entering city centres in'nine or ten' of the country's worst-affected cities. In 25 other towns, commercial diesel vehicles, including lorries, coaches and taxis, could face bans and charges. Affected cities include Birmingham, Leeds, Southampton, Nottingham and Derby, which already have plans to impose toxin taxes on older lorries, taxis and coaches starting in 2019, but could extend the taxes to diesel cars as well. Previous reports have shown that across London, the charges would affect vehicles sold before September 2015, which is at least 10million cars.