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Amazon unveils Ring sensor for mailboxes that alerts users if someone steals their mail

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The US Postal Service handles more than 187.7 million pieces of mail each day, which is how many opportunities a thief has to steal people's identities if they get their hands on the deliveries To combat these numbers, Amazon has designed a new Ring sensor that sits inside a mailbox and alerts users when it is opened or closed – allowing them to keep their mail safe and secure. The system was quietly revealed along with the tech giant's Ring Product Announcement Thursday, which included a home surveillance drone. The Mailbox Sensor pairs with the Ring app, allowing customers to receive real-time alerts, and is equipped with a camera that activates when the postbox is opened. Amazon has designed a new Ring sensor that sits inside a mailbox and alerts users when it is opened or closed – allowing them to keep their mail safe and secure. The technology is just $30 and is attached to the door or flap of a mailbox that is triggered every time it is opened or closed.


These gadgets will prevent your holiday packages from getting stolen

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

These gadgets will prevent your holiday packages from getting stolen (Photo: Reviewed.com) Recommendations are separate from any business incentives. It's that time of year again when a surplus of packages begins showing up at your doorstep--but how can you keep all of those holiday gifts safe from porch pirates when you're not at home? Roughly 8% of U.S. households (or 25.9 million Americans) said they've had holiday packages swiped from their front porch or doorstep, according to a 2017 report from InsuranceQuotes. Luckily, there are a handful of smart home products that can be your eyes and ears when you're at work or running errands and a package gets delivered.


Wi-Charge harnesses light to free Amazon Echo Dot and Google Home Mini smart speakers from power cords

PCWorld

A battery dock allows you to place the speaker anywhere in a room, not just in the proximity of an AC outlet. But those batteries will need recharging eventually, so most people who use them--myself included--end up leaving battery-docked smart speakers in the same places they'd be if they were AC-powered. A company called Wi-Charge claims it has a better solution: It has developed a battery-charging technology that harnesses the power of light. The power transmitter in this solution must be plugged into a wall, but the power receiver trickle-charges the battery in whatever device it's plugged into, keeping the battery forever topped off. Today, Wi-Charge announced new kits that work with Amazon Echo Dot and Google Home Mini smart speakers, so that the speakers can be placed anywhere in a room and operate without power cords.


RFID Camera Lock Smart Mailbox

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

A self-locking mailbox could someday flag down delivery drones and intelligently screen your driveway for intruders. Columbus State University computer scientist Lydia Ray presented the technology, called the ADDSMART project, during a 20 October session at the annual IEEE Ubiquitous Computing, Electronics, and Mobile Communication Conference in New York City. The project aims to achieve two goals: clearly marking addresses for autonomous vehicles, and reducing the energy and data storage costs of home surveillance systems. An early prototype mailbox attachment suggests that the trick, in both cases, may be radio-frequency identification. Powered by an Arduino Yun processor, one component of the ADDSMART device controls a high-frequency 13.56-MHz RFID reader, USB camera, passive-infrared motion sensor, solenoid lock, and an onboard Wi-Fi module.


Apple patent reveals latest plans for wireless charging

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Untangling masses of cables could become a thing of the past, if plans for long-distance charging via data connections become reality. It has long been rumoured that Apple is investigating the possibilities for wireless charging technology, but the latest patent filed by the firm reveals a surprising new approach. And it could one day allow people to charge their tablets, phones and other electronic devices using Wi-Fi, mobile data or even satellite signals. Apple's latest patent proposes using electromagnetic frequencies at the higher range, which are usually reserved for data transmission, to transmit power wirelessly to electronic devices Apple's new system would use electromagnetic frequencies at the higher range, which are usually reserved for data transmission. By directing a'beam' of energy over such frequencies, for example those used by Wi-Fi connections, a strong and stable signal could extend the range of existing wireless charging capabilities.