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Facebook Dating Looks a Lot Like Hinge

WIRED

When Facebook announced a new dating feature at its annual developer conference this week, it drew quick comparisons to existing apps like Tinder and Bumble. But the social network's matchmaking service, simply called Dating, most closely resembles another, lesser known dating app: Hinge. Facebook hasn't yet begun to test Dating, but the demo version touted on stage by CEO Mark Zuckerberg and chief product officer Chris Cox looks nearly identical to Hinge. This isn't the first time Facebook has ripped off a competitor; Instagram famously lifted Stories from Snapchat in 2016. And as in previous cases, Hinge probably doesn't have much recourse to stop them.


Bumble responds to Match's patent lawsuit

#artificialintelligence

Yesterday we reported that Match, the parent company of Tinder, was suing Bumble for patent infringement and misuse of intellectual property. Specifically, Match alleged that Bumble "copied Tinder's world-changing, card-swipe-based, mutual opt-in premise" for which a patent was filed in 2013 (before Bumble was founded) but just granted a few months ago. Today Bumble has responded to Match's lawsuit with a letter published on their own blog and other news outlets. The full letter is linked here and we'll also include it in full at the bottom of this post. Interestingly, Bumble's letter focuses less on the actual litigation and instead attempts to fill in readers about the context in which Match has decided to sue over this patent claim.


Bumble buys full-page ad to call out Match Group's 'scare tactics'

Mashable

That's the message dating app Bumble has for its competitor Match Group after the latter filed a patent infringement lawsuit on Friday. Bumble, founded and led by former Tinder executive Whitney Wolfe Herd, took out a full page ad in Tuesday's edition of the New York Times to speak openly about its frustrations with Match Group, a company that has repeatedly tried to buy and copy Bumble. SEE ALSO: Tinder's owner couldn't buy Bumble, so now the company is suing instead "We are going to tell our full side of the story in court, and we feel confident in that," Herd told Mashable in an interview on Tuesday. Bumble and its executives could not comment directly on the intricacies of the lawsuit nor any pending offers with Match Group, but according to Herd, regardless of circumstances, Match Group simply wouldn't be a match. Match Group owns dating apps Match.com,


Bumble sues Tinder's owners for stealing company secrets

Engadget

Bumble isn't done swiping left on Tinder's parent company Match Group. After publishing an open letter excoriating Match, the women-focused dating app has filed a lawsuit against Tinder's owner, accusing it of stealing trade secrets, among other things. Match started the legal battle when it sued Bumble for allegedly violating its patents, but TechCrunch says this isn't Bumble's response to that lawsuit -- it's a separate one altogether. In the complaint, Bumble argued that the patent lawsuit is baseless but admitted that the two were discussing acquisition over the past few months. It said that when Match found out other companies were interested in either acquiring Bumble or investing in it, Match filed that patent lawsuit to make the dating service less appealing to rival buyers and investors.


Tinder's owner couldn't buy Bumble, so now the company is suing instead

Mashable

Who owns Tinder, OkCupid, Match.com, and Plenty of Fish? If you said Match Group, Inc., you're correct and you should treat yourself to a cookie. After failing to buy Tinder/OkCupid/Match/PoF competitor Bumble last year for a reported $450 million, the parent company behind all of the aforementioned popular dating services is now suing the dating app for infringing on two of its patents. According to the lawsuit, Match Group is claiming Bumble, which was created by ex-Tinder executives, rips off Tinder almost in its entirety, with the exception of its "women-talk-first marketing strategy." Match Group alleges Bumble not only copied Tinder's now iconic swipe-based matching interface, but former employees Chris Gulczynski and Sarah Mick stole features for the dating app that were originally developed while they were at Tinder, such as the ability to undo an accidental wrong "swipe left" (rejection) on someone.