The world's smallest surgical robot is almost ready for the operating room

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By the end of 2018, surgeons in the United Kingdom could have a new assistant in the operating room: Versius, the world's smallest surgical robot. Created by CMR Surgical, the bot is essentially three robotic arms attached to a mobile unit about the size of a barstool, according to a recent report by The Guardian. A surgeon controls the bot from a control panel, guiding the arms as they carry out keyhole procedures (surgeries performed through tiny incisions in the body -- much less invasive than open surgeries, which require much larger incisions). CMR Surgical is in the process of getting Versius approved by UK regulators so that it can move out of the training room and into the operating room. The company hopes to pass this regulatory hurdle before the end of this year.


Learn how to open a brain up with this eerily realistic surgical simulator

Mashable

If you don't succeed, try and try again. Unless you are a surgeon. But this is all about to change, using nothing but pixels and data. Touch Surgery's cofounders, Dr. Jean Nehme and Dr. Andre Chow, are young surgeons who taught themselves how to code. Now, they're on a mission to transform medicine – by digitalizing it.


Digital Surgery Deploys First Surgical Artificial Intelligence System for the Operating Room

#artificialintelligence

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Digital Surgery, a health tech company shaping the future of surgery through the convergence of surgical expertise and technology, today announced it has developed and successfully demonstrated the world's first real-time, dynamic artificial intelligence (AI) system designed for the operating room (OR). The company is building the data to power the future of surgery through its world-class and proprietary surgical procedure road maps, which aim to aid the surgical team in the OR, reducing risk and making surgery safer. Digital Surgery is the first patented AI platform bringing this scale of knowledge to the surgical community. "This is a huge milestone for the future of surgery because it lays the foundation for how AI and computer vision will support surgical teams to deliver safer surgeries. It also enables the next generation of robotic surgery, giving these future systems the capability to function more intelligently and safely," said Dr. Jean Nehme MD, co-founder and CEO of Digital Surgery.


Brain surgery could be cut to 2 MINUTES thanks to drill

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robotic drill could be the future of surgery and could help cut the time of a routine brain operation from two hours - to two-and-a-half minutes. Developers believe the computer-driven gadget, which works like'Google Maps', could play a pivotal role in future surgical procedures. It can make one type of complex cranial surgery 50 times faster than standard procedures, researchers say. They claim the drill produces fast, clean and safe cuts, reducing the time the wound is open and the patient is anaesthetised. This decreases the chances of infection, human error and surgical cost.


Digital Surgery Deploys First Surgical Artificial Intelligence System for the Operating Room

#artificialintelligence

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Digital Surgery, a health tech company shaping the future of surgery through the convergence of surgical expertise and technology, today announced it has developed and successfully demonstrated the world's first real-time, dynamic artificial intelligence (AI) system designed for the operating room (OR). The company is building the data to power the future of surgery through its world-class and proprietary surgical procedure road maps, which aim to aid the surgical team in the OR, reducing risk and making surgery safer. Digital Surgery is the first patented AI platform bringing this scale of knowledge to the surgical community. "This is a huge milestone for the future of surgery because it lays the foundation for how AI and computer vision will support surgical teams to deliver safer surgeries. It also enables the next generation of robotic surgery, giving these future systems the capability to function more intelligently and safely," said Dr. Jean Nehme MD, co-founder and CEO of Digital Surgery.