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The 10 Mining Techniques Data Scientists Need For Their Own Toolbox

@machinelearnbot

At their core, data scientists have a math and statistics background. Out of this math background, they're creating advanced analytics. Just like their software engineering counterparts, data scientists will have to interact with the business side. This includes understanding the domain enough to make insights. Data scientists are often tasked with analyzing data to help the business, and this requires a level of business acumen. Finally, their results need to be given to the business in an understandable fashion. This requires the ability to verbally and visually communicate complex results and observations in a way that the business can understand and act on them. Thus, it'll be extremely valuable for any aspiring data scientists to learn data mining -- the process where one structures the raw data and formulate or recognize the various patterns in the data through the mathematical and computational algorithms. This helps generate new information and unlock various insights. Here is a simple list of reasons on why you should study Data Mining?


A Fuzzy Community-Based Recommender System Using PageRank

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recommendation systems are widely used by different user service providers specially those who have interactions with the large community of users. This paper introduces a recommender system based on community detection. The recommendation is provided using the local and global similarities between users. The local information is obtained from communities, and the global ones are based on the ratings. Here, a new fuzzy community detection using the personalized PageRank metaphor is introduced. The fuzzy membership values of the users to the communities are utilized to define a similarity measure. The method is evaluated by using two well-known datasets: MovieLens and FilmTrust. The results show that our method outperforms recent recommender systems.


Transforming Graph Data for Statistical Relational Learning

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Relational data representations have become an increasingly important topic due to the recent proliferation of network datasets (e.g., social, biological, information networks) and a corresponding increase in the application of Statistical Relational Learning (SRL) algorithms to these domains. In this article, we examine and categorize techniques for transforming graph-based relational data to improve SRL algorithms. In particular, appropriate transformations of the nodes, links, and/or features of the data can dramatically affect the capabilities and results of SRL algorithms. We introduce an intuitive taxonomy for data representation transformations in relational domains that incorporates link transformation and node transformation as symmetric representation tasks. More specifically, the transformation tasks for both nodes and links include (i) predicting their existence, (ii) predicting their label or type, (iii) estimating their weight or importance, and (iv) system- atically constructing their relevant features. We motivate our taxonomy through detailed examples and use it to survey competing approaches for each of these tasks. We also dis- cuss general conditions for transforming links, nodes, and features. Finally, we highlight challenges that remain to be addressed.


Transforming Graph Representations for Statistical Relational Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Relational data representations have become an increasingly important topic due to the recent proliferation of network datasets (e.g., social, biological, information networks) and a corresponding increase in the application of statistical relational learning (SRL) algorithms to these domains. In this article, we examine a range of representation issues for graph-based relational data. Since the choice of relational data representation for the nodes, links, and features can dramatically affect the capabilities of SRL algorithms, we survey approaches and opportunities for relational representation transformation designed to improve the performance of these algorithms. This leads us to introduce an intuitive taxonomy for data representation transformations in relational domains that incorporates link transformation and node transformation as symmetric representation tasks. In particular, the transformation tasks for both nodes and links include (i) predicting their existence, (ii) predicting their label or type, (iii) estimating their weight or importance, and (iv) systematically constructing their relevant features. We motivate our taxonomy through detailed examples and use it to survey and compare competing approaches for each of these tasks. We also discuss general conditions for transforming links, nodes, and features. Finally, we highlight challenges that remain to be addressed.


Real-Time Community Detection in Large Social Networks on a Laptop

arXiv.org Machine Learning

For a broad range of research, governmental and commercial applications it is important to understand the allegiances, communities and structure of key players in society. One promising direction towards extracting this information is to exploit the rich relational data in digital social networks (the social graph). As social media data sets are very large, most approaches make use of distributed computing systems for this purpose. Distributing graph processing requires solving many difficult engineering problems, which has lead some researchers to look at single-machine solutions that are faster and easier to maintain. In this article, we present a single-machine real-time system for large-scale graph processing that allows analysts to interactively explore graph structures. The key idea is that the aggregate actions of large numbers of users can be compressed into a data structure that encapsulates user similarities while being robust to noise and queryable in real-time. We achieve single machine real-time performance by compressing the neighbourhood of each vertex using minhash signatures and facilitate rapid queries through Locality Sensitive Hashing. These techniques reduce query times from hours using industrial desktop machines operating on the full graph to milliseconds on standard laptops. Our method allows exploration of strongly associated regions (i.e. communities) of large graphs in real-time on a laptop. It has been deployed in software that is actively used by social network analysts and offers another channel for media owners to monetise their data, helping them to continue to provide free services that are valued by billions of people globally.