Goto

Collaborating Authors

Why Human-Centered Design is Critical to AI-Driven Services

#artificialintelligence

The excitement of artificial intelligence continues. We keep hearing grand promises of a complete re-shaping of organizations and society thanks to big data and AI-powered projects. Media reports on new technical advances, and it's easy to get the feeling that new "artificial minds" are outperforming humans in more and more domains, ranging from healthcare, transportation, logistics, and financial investment, to games and even creativity. At the same time, recent studies estimate that 60 percent of data-driven and AI projects fail to even launch. And we also hear many concerns about the risks with AI, such as robots taking people's jobs and how negative bias can spread fake information that can amplify and distort public opinion.


Why Human-Centered Design is Critical to AI-Driven Services

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is continuing to advance. But in many AI initiatives, a critical component is missing. Read about why Human-Centered Design critical to succeed in the AI space, and how you can get started. The excitement of artificial intelligence (AI) continues. We keep hearing grand promises of a complete re-shaping of organizations and society thanks to big data and AI-powered projects.


Computers Play Chess; Humans Play Go

AITopics Original Links

The future of AI must involve exploring and understanding the parts of human intelligence we haven't been looking at that much--the stuff at the heart of human thought. To do this, we need to stop looking for new ways to solve well-defined problems and start looking for ways to combine the things we know how to do, and then see if this helps us explore problems with more diversity and scope.


Don't Touch the Computer - Behavioral Scientist

#artificialintelligence

Deep Blue's 1997 victory over world champion Garry Kasparov was the beginning of the end of mankind's chess dominance. A game once believed to be the pinnacle of human intelligence was being taken over by computers. In 2005--a mere eight years later--the world's seventh ranked player was thrashed by a supercomputer, managing only a draw over six games. And in 2006, world champion Vladimir Kramnik was defeated by Deep Fritz, a software program running not on a supercomputer, but a model you could purchase at your neighborhood electronics store. Today, the state of play is decidedly one-sided.


Poker bots raise the stakes for human players

AITopics Original Links

A DOZEN men wearing dark green T-shirts and wide grins whoop, shake hands and high-five, while another group in navy blue baseball caps do their best to look magnanimous in defeat in front of several dozen onlookers. In most respects this was a low-key event, but the scene, at a nondescript booth of a Las Vegas convention centre in July this year, may to be a pivotal moment for the development of artificial intelligence. That's because at the Gaming Life Expo at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino, a computer program called Polaris became the first to beat a team of world-class poker players, each of whom had previously won more than $1 million. Some may see the victory as the latest dismal step in silicon's march towards superiority over humans. Others will view it as an exciting move forward in artificial intelligence – a foretaste of the sophisticated tasks computers should be able to perform for us in years to come.