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The Future is Digital Healthcare

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Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, the use of digital technology in healthcare was on a steady rise; however, the pandemic has spurred rapid development of digital health technology as well as rapid adoption and utilization of that technology in the industry. Digital health holds the promise of increased accessibility to high-quality, patient-centered care that can also increase patient engagement and reduce costs. However, the full realization of this promise may be threatened by policy and regulation that is failing to keep pace with and encourage this evolution. There is no universally accepted definition of digital health. In fact, researchers studying the definition recently came across no fewer than 95 published definitions for the concept of digital health.1 There were, however, some clear patterns: there is an emphasis on how data is used to improve care; there is a focus on the provision of healthcare, rather than the use of technology; and the definitions tend to highlight the well-being of people and populations over the caring of patients with diseases. As used in this article, digital health encompasses the use of digital tools and technologies to improve and manage an individual's or a population's health and wellness.


Health systems are in need of radical change; virtual care will lead the way

MIT Technology Review

The covid-19 pandemic has shown us how much health care is in need of not just tweaking but radical change. The pressure on global health systems, providers, and staff has already been increasing to unsustainable levels. But it also illustrates how much can be achieved in times of crisis: for example, China and the UK recently built thousands of extra beds in intensive care units, or ICUs, in less than two weeks. Health-care reform will need to spur a totally different approach to how care is organized, delivered, and distributed, which will be paramount in a (hopefully soon) post-covid-19 era. It's the only way to deliver the quadruple aim of health care: better outcomes, improved patient and staff experience, and lower cost of care.


Why healthcare analytics will deliver more results in 2019

#artificialintelligence

We find ourselves on the cusp of some very interesting dynamics in 2019 from a healthcare technology and innovation perspective. Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) including machine learning, natural language processing (NLP) and robotics have shown incredible promise in terms of automating repetitive manual tasks as well as improving decision making. Leaders in the healthcare industry--as well as technology vendors--are witnessing this first hand and are planning to integrate AI with next generation analytics platforms to empower executives, clinicians and analysts with unprecedented actionable insights from the board room to the point of care. Here are some key trends enabled by AI that are empowering stakeholders across the healthcare continuum, from policy makers and executives, to physicians and patients. AI and analytics integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) will enable superior care delivery and personalized care at a lower cost.


Top 10 Healthcare Industry Trends & Innovations in 2021

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Healthcare industry trends that we witness today are new technologies and solutions that address the requirements for clinical diagnosis, treatment, and disease management. The global COVID-19 pandemic led to an upsurge in technologies for disinfecting, limiting transmission, detecting disease spread, as well as for treatment, patient management, and immunization. The advancements in the healthcare industry range from e-consultations, telemedicine, real-time diagnosis to accessing digital therapeutics provided by immersion technology tools. Genetic analysis, clinical data storage, and big data & analytics enable the development of precision medicine. The adoption of artificial intelligence (AI), the internet of things (IoT), and data management practices is making hospitals smarter. These solutions enhance workflows and staff scheduling and provide connected infrastructure, devices, and systems to accelerate accurate and equitable clinical services. For this in-depth research on the Top Healthcare Industry Trends & Startups, we analyzed a sample of 3.622 global startups and scaleups.


Healthcare Analytics: Analytics and machine learning - Analytics Magazine

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The U.S. healthcare system is well on its way in the transition to value-based payment models that reward providers for delivering quality outcomes and keeping patients healthy. In fact, as of March 2016, the Department of Health and Human Services reported that an estimated 30 percent of Medicare payments were already tied to these new alternative payment systems. Value-based programs are replacing traditional fee-for-service models that pay providers based on the number of services delivered. The newer models are designed to encourage care that is well-coordinated, cost-effective and lead to quality patient outcomes. In order to achieve new payment objectives, providers are seeking opportunities to engage patients in their own care, improve patient satisfaction and keep patients healthier.