CNL Software expands IPSecurityCenter to support Herta face detection software

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CNL Software has entered into a technology partnership with Herta Security under the CNL Software Technology Alliance Program. Herta develops user-friendly software solutions that enable the integration of facial recognition in security applications. According to the announcement, Herta's deep learning algorithms encode faces directly into small templates, which are very fast to compare and yield more accurate results. This provides a technological advantage when working with partners, as it allows the development of more robust, safer and efficient solutions. IPSecurityCenter PSIM takes a vendor agnostic approach to implement flexible and scalable security management software.


US army boffins use AI to spot faces in the dark

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US army researchers have developed a convolutional neural network and a range of algorithms to recognise faces in the dark. "This technology enables matching between thermal face images and existing biometric face databases or watch lists that only contain visible face imagery," explained Benjamin Riggan on Monday, co-author of the study and an electronics engineer at the US army laboratory. "The technology provides a way for humans to visually compare visible and thermal facial imagery through thermal-to-visible face synthesis." The thermal images are processed and passed to a convolutional neural network to extract facial features using landmarks that mark the corners of the eyes, nose and lips to determine its overall shape. The system, dubbed "multi-region synthesis" is trained with a loss function so that the error between the thermal images and the visible ones is minimized, creating an accurate portrayal of what someone's face looks like despite only glimpsing it in the dark.


How Face Recognition Evolved Using Artificial Intelligence

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This blog is syndicated from The New Rules of Privacy: Building Loyalty with Connected Consumers in the Age of Face Recognition and AI. To learn more click here. Since the invention of face recognition in the 1960s, has any single technology sparked more fascination for public safety officials, companies, journalists and Hollywood? When people learn that I'm the CEO of a face recognition company, they commonly reference its fictional use in shows like CSI, Black Mirror or even films such as the 1980s James Bond movie A View to a Kill. Most often, however, they mention Minority Report starring Tom Cruise.


A Compact Embedding for Facial Expression Similarity

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Most of the existing work on automatic facial expression analysis focuses on discrete emotion recognition, or facial action unit detection. However, facial expressions do not always fall neatly into pre-defined semantic categories. Also, the similarity between expressions measured in the action unit space need not correspond to how humans perceive expression similarity. Different from previous work, our goal is to describe facial expressions in a continuous fashion using a compact embedding space that mimics human visual preferences. To achieve this goal, we collect a large-scale faces-in-the-wild dataset with human annotations in the form: Expressions A and B are visually more similar when compared to expression C, and use this dataset to train a neural network that produces a compact (16-dimensional) expression embedding. We experimentally demonstrate that the learned embedding can be successfully used for various applications such as expression retrieval, photo album summarization, and emotion recognition. We also show that the embedding learned using the proposed dataset performs better than several other embeddings learned using existing emotion or action unit datasets.


An A.I. Pioneer Wants an FDA for Facial Recognition

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Erik Learned-Miller is one reason we talk about facial recognition at all. In 2007, years before the current A.I. boom made "deep learning" and "neural networks" common phrases in Silicon Valley, Learned-Miller and three colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst released a dataset of faces titled Labelled Faces in the Wild. To you or me, Labelled Faces in the Wild just looks like folders of unremarkable images. You can download them and look for yourself. There's boxer Joe Gatti, gloves raised mid-fight.