After a decade, U.N. chief disappointed in many world leaders

The Japan Times

UNITED NATIONS โ€“ U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says he's disappointed by many world leaders who care more about retaining power than improving the lives of their people -- and can't understand why Syria is being held hostage to "the destiny" of one man, President Bashar Assad. Nearing the end of his 10 years at the helm of the United Nations, Ban spoke frankly about the state of the world and his successes, failures and frustrations as U.N. chief in a wide-ranging interview with The Associated Press. Ban is the public face of the organization but he said that in private leaders see a very different and much tougher side to him. "People say I have been quiet, and I have not been speaking out about human rights, but I can tell you I have been speaking out (more) than any of the Western leaders" who "are very cautious," he said. "You have not seen people as fearlessly speaking out as myself."


After a decade, UN chief disappointed in many world leaders

Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS (AP) โ€” U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says he's disappointed by many world leaders who care more about retaining power than improving the lives of their people โ€” and can't understand why Syria is being held hostage to "the destiny" of one man, President Bashar Assad.


Israel's Peres in serious but stable condition after stroke

Associated Press

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, at his residence in Jerusalem. Former Israeli President Shimon Peres on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016, suffered a stroke and was rushed to a hospital, where he was sedated and placed on a respirator ahead of a brain scan. FILE - In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, at his residence in Jerusalem. FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2015 file photo, former Israeli President Shimon Peres speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Jerusalem.


Israel's Peres in serious but stable condition after stroke

Associated Press

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, at his residence in Jerusalem. FILE - In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014, file photo, Israel's President Shimon Peres speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, at his residence in Jerusalem. FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2015 file photo, former Israeli President Shimon Peres speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Jerusalem. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who defeated Peres in 1996 to become prime minister, personally called the hospital to enquire on Peres' condition and posted a Facebook message wishing him a speedy recovery.


Israel's Peres in serious but stable condition after stroke

Associated Press

Prof. Raphy Walden, former Israeli President Shimon Peres' doctor speaks with journalists outside the hospital ward where Peres is hospitalized, in Tel Aviv, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016. Peres suffered a "major stroke" on Tuesday and experienced heavy bleeding in the brain, hospital officials said, as doctors raced to stabilize the 93-year-old Nobel laureate. Prof. Raphy Walden, former Israeli President Shimon Peres' doctor speaks with journalists outside the hospital ward where Peres is hospitalized, in Tel Aviv, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016. Peres suffered a "major stroke" on Tuesday and experienced heavy bleeding in the brain, hospital officials said, as doctors raced to stabilize the 93-year-old Nobel laureate.