Identifying dolphins with technology

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"Researchers photograph dolphins in their natural surroundings and compare new dorsal fin photographs against a catalogue of previously identified dolphins," explains Kelly Debure, professor of computer science at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida. "These catalogs are often organized into categories based on either distinct fin shape or location of predominant damage. The manual photo-identification process, although effective, is extremely time consuming and visually stressful, particularly with large collections of known dolphins." It was time to bring dolphin identification into the digital age. Debure, along with Eckerd students, developed DARWIN, or Digital Analysis and Recognition of Whale Images on a Network, a computer program that simplifies photo-identification of bottlenose dolphins by applying computer vision and signal processing techniques to automate much of the tedious manual photo-id process.


Your New CSO Might Be a Learning Computer That Loves Cats

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IT security is a dangerous and expensive hellhole. Vast amounts of money are spent protecting company data and networks. Hordes of bad guys are motivated to break in, and the consequences for failure are more painful than the cost of protection. Worse, the current ways that Chief Security Officers (CSOs) deal with security are intrusive. While core security tools such as managed endpoint protection will always be necessary, every one of us has bemoaned the difficulty of managing passwords, cussed about access rights to the software we need, and complained about the barriers between us and the work we need to do.


Your New CSO Might Be a Learning Computer That Loves Cats

#artificialintelligence

Worse, the current ways that Chief Security Officers (CSOs) deal with security are intrusive. While core security tools such as managed endpoint protection will always be necessary, every one of us has bemoaned the difficulty of managing passwords, cussed about access rights to the software we need, and complained about the barriers between us and the work we need to do. If security procedures worked 100 percent of the time, perhaps we'd be okay with it--but hey, have you noticed how many breaches are still reported? Just take a look at how the number of data breaches per year has exploded in this graphic below (by data analytics and visualization blog Sparkling Data).


Can my computer recognise my cat?

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In 2012, Google created an'artificial neural network' and fed it millions of pictures from the internet. Could your computer now identify your cat more accurately than you?


Here's Why This Cat-Spotting AI Is Different

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In 2012, Google researchers found a whimsical way to show off the power of the company's artificial intelligence technology: They trained computers to recognize cats in YouTube videos. The project took years to pull off and required 16,000 computer processors to analyze 10 million images. That type of AI, known as deep learning, now powers Amazon.com's While such software can seem magical, it still typically requires thousands of computers to spend months scanning millions of data points. Ben Vigoda, an MIT-trained computer scientist (and nephew of late actor Abe Vigoda), says he can cut out most of the grunt work and make AI projects doable for businesses without Google-level resources.