Identifying dolphins with technology

AITopics Original Links

"Researchers photograph dolphins in their natural surroundings and compare new dorsal fin photographs against a catalogue of previously identified dolphins," explains Kelly Debure, professor of computer science at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida. "These catalogs are often organized into categories based on either distinct fin shape or location of predominant damage. The manual photo-identification process, although effective, is extremely time consuming and visually stressful, particularly with large collections of known dolphins." It was time to bring dolphin identification into the digital age. Debure, along with Eckerd students, developed DARWIN, or Digital Analysis and Recognition of Whale Images on a Network, a computer program that simplifies photo-identification of bottlenose dolphins by applying computer vision and signal processing techniques to automate much of the tedious manual photo-id process.


Your New CSO Might Be a Learning Computer That Loves Cats

#artificialintelligence

IT security is a dangerous and expensive hellhole. Vast amounts of money are spent protecting company data and networks. Hordes of bad guys are motivated to break in, and the consequences for failure are more painful than the cost of protection. Worse, the current ways that Chief Security Officers (CSOs) deal with security are intrusive. While core security tools such as managed endpoint protection will always be necessary, every one of us has bemoaned the difficulty of managing passwords, cussed about access rights to the software we need, and complained about the barriers between us and the work we need to do.


Your New CSO Might Be a Learning Computer That Loves Cats

#artificialintelligence

Worse, the current ways that Chief Security Officers (CSOs) deal with security are intrusive. While core security tools such as managed endpoint protection will always be necessary, every one of us has bemoaned the difficulty of managing passwords, cussed about access rights to the software we need, and complained about the barriers between us and the work we need to do. If security procedures worked 100 percent of the time, perhaps we'd be okay with it--but hey, have you noticed how many breaches are still reported? Just take a look at how the number of data breaches per year has exploded in this graphic below (by data analytics and visualization blog Sparkling Data).


Can my computer recognise my cat?

#artificialintelligence

In 2012, Google created an'artificial neural network' and fed it millions of pictures from the internet. Could your computer now identify your cat more accurately than you?


Japan's notorious dolphin hunt is where the world's aquariums shop

Los Angeles Times

The notorious annual dolphin hunt got underway last week in the small Japanese town of Taiji. During the six-month hunting season, terrified dolphins are violently herded into a narrow cove. Most are slaughtered -- but scores of "good-looking" ones are captured and shipped off to aquariums. The Taiji hunts always receive a barrage of condemnation, and especially so since the release of the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Cove" in 2009. While the hunters maintain they are culling dolphin "pests" who eat too many fish, the primary economic incentive for the Taiji drive hunts is the aquarium industry.