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CBSE to introduce artificial intelligence courses in classes 8, 9, 10

#artificialintelligence

Aiming to make school students well-versed in technologies shaping the future, the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has decided to introduce artificial intelligence as an elective subject. "The decision to introduce artificial intelligence as a skill subject was taken at a recent meeting of the board's governing body. It has been decided that the subject would be introduced in classes 8, 9 and 10 as a skill subject," a member of the board's governing body said. Artificial intelligence is the ability of a machine to think, learn and perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition and decision-making skills. Capabilities demonstrated by machines, including computers, from playing chess to operating cars and beyond, fall within the domain of artificial intelligence.


CBSE planned to offer Artificial Intelligence as optional subject in schools

#artificialintelligence

Young students can shape up their career orientation only when they are not loaded with content-based curriculum, CBSE's Skill Education Director Biswajit Saha said on Tuesday. The flexibility in the system should be adopted by the school curriculum and the focus needs to be on activity-based skill formation of students, he said at an education summit organised by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India. As part of new-age skill education, CBSE has planned to offer Artificial Intelligence (AI) as an optional sixth subject for class 11 students from academic session 2109-20 onwards. Further, an AI-inspired module of 12 hours will be introduced for class 8 students by CBSE. Apart from artificial intelligence, subjects such as yoga, early childhood education will also be introduced as electives.


CBSE planned to offer Artificial Intelligence as optional subject in schools

#artificialintelligence

Young students can shape up their career orientation only when they are not loaded with content-based curriculum, CBSE's Skill Education Director Biswajit Saha said on Tuesday. The flexibility in the system should be adopted by the school curriculum and the focus needs to be on activity-based skill formation of students, he said at an education summit organised by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India. As part of new-age skill education, CBSE has planned to offer Artificial Intelligence (AI) as an optional sixth subject for class 11 students from academic session 2109-20 onwards. Further, an AI-inspired module of 12 hours will be introduced for class 8 students by CBSE. Apart from artificial intelligence, subjects such as yoga, early childhood education will also be introduced as electives.


Class failure rates at Boston schools up 4.6%, district shares in remote learning update

Boston Herald

Failing grades across four core subjects at Boston Public Schools are up 4.6% compared to last year and the rate of students failing at least one class has also increased, district officials announced in a remote learning update. The first quarter marking period for Boston students in grades 6-12 wrapped up in November and data shows kids are struggling most in social studies with a 6% increase in failing grades. The rate this quarter was 17% compared to 11% this time last year. Not far behind is English language arts, with a 5.7% increase in failures, math with a 3.5% increase and a 3.4% failure increase in science courses. "Consistent with nationwide trends, there has been an increase in course failure rates when comparing to quarter one grades from last year," said Monica Hogan, of the BPS Office of Data and Accountability in a Wednesday night school committee meeting.


Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and (2) doing more careful psychological measurements

#artificialintelligence

Kevin Lewis and Paul Alper send me so much material, I think they need their own blogs. In the meantime, I keep posting the stuff they send me, as part of my desperate effort to empty my inbox. "Should Students Assessed as Needing Remedial Mathematics Take College-Level Quantitative Courses Instead? A Randomized Controlled Trial," by A. W. Logue, Mari Watanabe-Rose, and Daniel Douglas, which begins: Many college students never take, or do not pass, required remedial mathematics courses theorized to increase college-level performance. Some colleges and states are therefore instituting policies allowing students to take college-level courses without first taking remedial courses.