This hi-tech arm can slither down a patient's throat and perform surgery

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A snake-like robot could soon assist surgeons in the operating room. The flexible system is best suited for minimally invasive surgeries, and can slither down a patient's throat to reach typically hard to access areas. Equipped with a high-definition camera and a joystick controller, the Flex Robotic System allows surgeons to navigate non-linear regions of the anatomy and avoid obstacles. A snake-like robot could soon assist surgeons in the operating room. The flexible system is best suited for minimally invasive surgeries, and can slither down a patient's throat to reach typically hard to access areas The robotic OR assistant was first thought up in 2004 by Howie Choset, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute and co-founder of Medrobotics, Bloomberg reports.


Will Robots Replace Surgeons in 2018?

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The presence of robots in our hospitals may once have been the preserve of science fiction, but in recent years the ongoing development of robotics technology has led some to suggest that it may now be closer than we think. Could 2018 be the year that we see robots begin to replace human surgeons? Surgical robotics, in one form or another, has actually been in use for longer than you might think. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration approved an early robotic surgical technology, called the da Vinci Surgical System, consisting of mechanical arms operated by a human surgeon, back in 2000 [1]. Since then new developments and an increasing complexity in the field of robotics has led to more and more devices and tools finding their way into operating theatres, to such an extent that the future for robotic surgery looks extremely bright.


Deakin University unveils first robotic surgical system with sense of touch

ZDNet

Deakin University in Melbourne has unveiled the HeroSurg robot, which gives surgeons, for the first time, the sense of touch while they perform surgery via a computer. Unveiled on Wednesday at the Australasian Simulation Congress, the university claims HeroSurg to be a major breakthrough compared to current technology, which limits robotic surgery to the sense of sight. Giving surgeons the added sense of touch through technology known as haptic feedback means laparoscopic or keyhole microsurgery will be safer and more accurate by reducing trauma and lowering the risk of blood loss and infection. HeroSurg is the world's first robot that provides surgeons the sense of touch HeroSurg was developed in the laboratory at Deakin's Waurn Ponds campus in Geelong by engineers from Deakin and Harvard, along with professor Suren Krishnan, who in 2008 became the first Australian surgeon to use the da Vinci surgical system for ear, nose, and throat procedures. Krishnan, from the Royal Adelaide Hospital and an honorary professor at the Deakin Institute for Intelligent Systems Research and Innovation (IISRI), said HeroSurg's added sense of touch improves the ability of surgeons to distinguish between normal tissue and tissue affected by cancer.


Robots that understand human anatomy could make surgery more effective

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Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci robot is a technical marvel. Nearly half a million operations were performed in the U.S. by surgeons controlling its large, precise arms last year. One in four U.S. hospitals has one or more of the machines, which perform the majority of robotic surgeries worldwide and are credited with making minimally invasive surgery commonplace. But when executives from Verb Surgical, a secretive joint venture between Alphabet and Johnson & Johnson, presented at the robotics industry conference RoboBusiness late last month, they made the da Vinci sound lame. Intuitive's machine, with an average selling price of $1.54 million, is too expensive and bulky, they grumbled.


Robots that understand human anatomy could make surgery more effective

#artificialintelligence

Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci robot is a technical marvel. Nearly half a million operations were performed in the U.S. by surgeons controlling its large, precise arms last year. One in four U.S. hospitals has one or more of the machines, which perform the majority of robotic surgeries worldwide and are credited with making minimally invasive surgery commonplace. But when executives from Verb Surgical, a secretive joint venture between Alphabet and Johnson & Johnson, presented at the robotics industry conference RoboBusiness late last month, they made the da Vinci sound lame. Intuitive's machine, with an average selling price of $1.54 million, is too expensive and bulky, they grumbled.