AI for Accessibility

#artificialintelligence

According to the World Health Organization, 1 billion people on Earth have some form of disability. It's not surprising, then, that Microsoft's AI for Good campaign supports efforts that drive accessibility, empowering people to achieve more, regardless of their level of ability. AI for Good is a $50 million commitment from Microsoft to enable innovators to create solutions that leverage artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. The support includes use of Microsoft's Azure cloud and AI tools. AI can serve as the'brains' behind tools that enhance independence and productivity for people who have disabilities.


Superheroes, puppies, hippos – and AI – are helping children with disabilities bridge language gaps - AI for Business

#artificialintelligence

How did you learn to talk? Probably something like this: Your infant brain, a hotbed of neurological activity, picked up on your parents' speech tones and facial expressions. You started to mimic their sounds, interpret their emotions and identify relatives from strangers. And one day, about a year into life, you pointed and started saying a few meaningful words with slobbery glee. But many children, particularly those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, acquire language in different ways.


Superheroes, puppies, hippos – and AI – are helping children with disabilities bridge language gaps - Microsoft Malaysia News Center

#artificialintelligence

How did you learn to talk? Probably something like this: Your infant brain, a hotbed of neurological activity, picked up on your parents' speech tones and facial expressions. You started to mimic their sounds, interpret their emotions and identify relatives from strangers. And one day, about a year into life, you pointed and started saying a few meaningful words with slobbery glee. But many children, particularly those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, acquire language in different ways.


Existing Technologies Can Assist the Disabled

Communications of the ACM

More than 20% of U.S. adults live with some form of disability, according to a September 2015 report released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The latest generation of smartphones, tablets, and personal computers are equipped with accessibility features that make using these devices easier, or at least, less onerous, for those who have sight, speech, or hearing impairments. These enhancements include functions such as screen-reading technology (which reads aloud text when the user passes a finger over it); screen-flashing notification when a call or message comes in for the hearing impaired; and voice controls of basic functions for those who are unable to physically manipulate the phone or computing device's controls. Other technologies that can help the disabled have or are coming to market, and not all of them are focused simply on providing access to computers or smartphones. Irrespective of the accessibility provided, most market participants agree more needs to be done to help those with disabilities to fully experience our increasingly digital world.


7 smart tech developments for people who are blind or have low vision Microsoft On The Issues

#artificialintelligence

It's estimated that there are about 36 million people in the world who are blind, and a further 216 million who live with moderate to severe visual impairments. Although the World Health Organization points out that up to 80% of vision impairment around the world is avoidable with better access to treatment, the number of people who are blind or have low vision is rising as the global population ages. But technology is playing a vital role in tearing down barriers, and artificial intelligence is making real inroads into improving accessibility. Here are seven examples of how smart technology can be a game-changer, allowing everyone to interact with the world in new ways. As we've reported, Microsoft's Seeing AI is an app designed to help people with low vision or who are blind.