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The Last Frontiers of AI: Can Scientists Design Creativity and Self-Awareness?

#artificialintelligence

Is creativity a uniquely human trait? Defining the line between human and machine is becoming blurrier by the day as startups, big companies, and research institutions all compete to build the next generation of advanced AI. This arms race is bringing a new era of AI that won't prove its power by mastering human games, but by independently exhibiting ingenuity and creativity. Sophisticated AI is undertaking increasingly complex tasks like stock market predictions, research synthesis, political speech writing--don't worry, this article was still written by a human--and companies are beginning to pair deep learning with new robotics and digital manufacturing tools to create "smart manufacturing." Hod Lipson, professor of engineering at Columbia University and the director of Columbia's Creative Machines Labs, is pushing the next frontier of AI.


The Last Frontiers of AI: Can Scientists Design Creativity and Self-Awareness?

#artificialintelligence

That's where hallucinations, reflexes, Post Traumatic Stress, Phobias, and most importantly, dreams come from. You are right, the mind doesn't deal with much external data. Sense organs are all processed elsewhere, however, some sections of processing overlap, autonomic vs. reflex, etc. The conscious portion of human beings is very tiny compared with all the subconscious and unconscious/automatic processes going on.



The Last Frontiers of AI: Can Scientists Design Creativity and Self-Awareness?

#artificialintelligence

Is creativity a uniquely human trait? Defining the line between human and machine is becoming blurrier by the day as startups, big companies, and research institutions all compete to build the next generation of advanced AI. This arms race is bringing a new era of AI that won't prove its power by mastering human games, but by independently exhibiting ingenuity and creativity. Sophisticated AI is undertaking increasingly complex tasks like stock market predictions, research synthesis, political speech writing--don't worry, this article was still written by a human--and companies are beginning to pair deep learning with new robotics and digital manufacturing tools to create "smart manufacturing." Hod Lipson, professor of engineering at Columbia University and the director of Columbia's Creative Machines Labs, is pushing the next frontier of AI. It's an era that will be defined by biology-inspired machines that can evolve, self-model, and self-reflect--where machines will generate new ideas, and then build them. Fueling Lipson's work is the holy grail of AI--the pursuit of self-aware robots.


Boston Dynamics' robots are preparing to leave the lab -- is the world ready?

#artificialintelligence

Not many robotics companies can boast legions of fans online, but not many robotics companies make robots quite like Boston Dynamics. Each time the firm shares new footage of its machines, they cause a sensation. Whether it's a pack of robot dogs towing a truck or a human-like bot leaping nimbly up a set of boxes, Boston Dynamics' bots are uniquely thrilling. And when a parody video circulated last month showing a CGI "Bosstown Dynamics" robot turning on its creators, many mistook it for the real thing -- a testament to how far the company has pushed what seems technologically possible. But for all its engineering prowess, Boston Dynamics now faces its biggest challenge yet: turning its stable of robots into an actual business.