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Authors Guild denied appeal to stop Google scanning books

The Guardian

A long-running face-off between the US Authors Guild and Google over the search engine's scanning of millions of books was brought to an end yesterday when the US Supreme Court denied the writers the right to appeal. Backed by authors including Nobel laureate JM Coetzee and the Booker winners Richard Flanagan and Margaret Atwood, the Authors Guild appealed to the Supreme Court in February over the ruling that Google's scanning of millions of books constituted "fair use", and that "Google Books provide significant public benefits". Once scanned, the books, both in and out of copyright, are included in Google Books, which enables users to read extracts from books and search their texts. The copyright infringement case was originally filed in 2005, when the Authors Guild said that "Google's taking was a plain and brazen violation of copyright law". Authors have argued that fair use should not "permit a wealthy for-profit entity to digitise millions of works and to cut off authors' licensing of their reproduction, distribution, and public display rights".


Google Books just won a decade-long copyright fight

Washington Post - Technology News

The legal fight over Google's effort to create a digital library of millions of book is finally over. The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge from authors who had argued that the tech giant's project was "brazen violation of copyright law" -- effectively ending the decade-long legal battle in Google's favor. Without the Supreme Court taking up the case, a federal appeals court ruling from October, which found the book scanning program fell under the umbrella of fair use, will stand. Back in 2004, Google started scanning millions of books from major research libraries -- creating a vast database from the digitized copies known as Google Books. Users can search Google Books for quotes or keywords, and it will display paragraphs or pages of context for the results from within the books.


Supreme Court Rejects Challenge To Google Book-Scanning Project

International Business Times

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge by a group of authors who contend that Google's massive effort to scan millions of books for an online library violates copyright law. The Authors Guild and several individual writers have argued that the project, known as Google Books, illegally deprives them of revenue. The high court left in place an October 2015 ruling by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York in favor of Google. A unanimous three-judge appeals court panel said the case "tests the boundaries of fair use," but found Google's practices were ultimately allowed under the law. The individual plaintiffs who filed the proposed class action against Google included former New York Yankees pitcher Jim Bouton, who wrote the acclaimed memoir "Ball Four."


Supreme Court rejects challenge to Google's online library

PBS NewsHour

The Supreme Court let stand lower court rulings in favor of Google. WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court turned away a challenge Monday to Google's online book library from authors who complained that the project makes it harder for them to market their work. The justices let stand lower court rulings in favor of Mountain View, California-based Google and rejected the authors' claim that the company's digitizing of millions of books amounts to "copyright infringement on an epic scale." Lower courts have said that Google can provide small portions of the books to the public without violating copyright laws. The Authors Guild and individual authors first filed their challenge to Google's digital book project in 2005.


Supreme Court rejects challenge to Google's online library

U.S. News

The Supreme Court turned away a challenge Monday to Google's online book library from authors who complained that the project makes it harder for them to market their work. The justices let stand lower court rulings in favor of Mountain View, California-based Google and rejected the authors' claim that the company's digitizing of millions of books amounts to "copyright infringement on an epic scale." Lower courts have said that Google can provide small portions of the books to the public without violating copyright laws. The Authors Guild and individual authors first filed their challenge to Google's digital book project in 2005. Google Inc. has made digital copies of more than 20 million books from major research libraries and established a publicly available search function.