New report calls for ban on 'killer robots' amid U.N. meeting

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A full-scale figure of a Terminator "T-800" robot used in the movie "Terminator 2" is displayed at a preview of the Terminator Exhibition in Tokyo on March 18, 2009. UNITED NATIONS -- Technology allowing a pre-programmed robot to shoot to kill, or a tank to fire at a target with no human involvement, is only years away, experts say. A new report called Monday for a ban on such "killer robots." The report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic was released as the United Nations kicked off a week-long meeting on such weapons in Geneva. The report calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances.


Ex-Google employee warns of 'disturbing' plans to launch Chinese search engine

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A former employee of Google has warned of the web giant's'disturbing' plans for a search engine in China which could help Beijing monitor its citizens online. Jack Poulson wrote in a letter to the US Senate's commerce committee that the proposed Dragonfly website was'tailored to the censorship and surveillance demands of the Chinese government'. In his letter he also claimed that discussion of the plans among Google employees had been'increasingly stifled'. Mr Poulson was a senior research scientist at Google until he resigned last month in protest at the Dragonfly proposals. A former employee of Google has warned of the web giant's'disturbing' plans for a search engine in China which could help Beijing monitor its citizens online While China is home to the world's largest number of internet users, a 2015 report by US think tank Freedom House found that the country had the most restrictive online use policies of 65 nations it studied, ranking below Iran and Syria.


Israeli airlines sued for intrusive body search

Al Jazeera

Jerusalem - Three young Palestinian women are suing two Israeli airlines, El Al and Arkia, for an "intrusive body search", alleging racial profiling by Israeli security personnel in Belgrade Airport before a Tel Aviv-bound flight. The three women, who are Palestinian citizens of Israel, told Al Jazeera that the body search - which took place last October - went well beyond a pat-down and amounted to sexual assault. The incident exceeded two hours, during which the women say they were threatened with being denied permission to board the plane if they did not agree to a strip search. The defence has until October 20 to answer to the charges, after which the court will appoint a trial date in Tel Aviv. "I overheard the chief security officer tell [a female officer] that if I did not take off my bra I will not get on the plane," one of the plaintiffs, who asked that her name not be published, told Al Jazeera.


Intel Completes Tender Offer for Mobileye Intel Newsroom

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SANTA CLARA, Calif., and JERUSALEM, Aug. 8, 2017 -- Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC) and Mobileye N.V. (NYSE: MBLY) today announced the completion of Intel's tender offer for outstanding ordinary shares of Mobileye, a global leader in the development of computer vision and machine learning, data analysis, localization and mapping for advanced driver assistance systems and autonomous driving. The acquisition is expected to accelerate innovation for the automotive industry and positions Intel as a leading technology provider in the fast-growing market for highly and fully autonomous vehicles. The combination of Intel and Mobileye will allow Mobileye's leading computer vision expertise (the "eyes") to complement Intel's high-performance computing and connectivity expertise (the "brains") to create automated driving solutions from cloud to car. Intel estimates the vehicle systems, data and services market opportunity to be up to $70 billion by 2030. "With Mobileye, Intel emerges as a leader in creating the technology foundation that the automotive industry needs for an autonomous future," said Intel CEO Brian Krzanich.


China blasts U.S. human rights in tit-for-tat report

The Japan Times

BEIJING – China on Thursday blasted the U.S. on its human rights record in its annual tit-for-tat report, saying money and family connections are corrupting politics and calling U.S. airstrikes in Syria and Iraq a "gross violation of other countries' human rights." The report issued by the Cabinet's State Council Information Office also cited gun crime and excessive use of force by police, and touched on other topics including corruption in the prison system, homelessness, racial conflict and gender pay disparity. "Since the U.S. government can't be bothered to raise a mirror to look at itself, it's up to others to complete the task," the report said. The U.S. is also guilty of rights violations outside its borders, the report said, citing estimates of civilian deaths in Iraqi and Syrian airstrikes, drone attacks and the monitoring of foreign citizens' communications. "America is still committing gross violations of other countries' human rights, viewing lives in other countries as worthless," it said.