Mapping the Brain to Build Better Machines Quanta Magazine

#artificialintelligence

Take a three year-old to the zoo, and she intuitively knows that the long-necked creature nibbling leaves is the same thing as the giraffe in her picture book. That superficially easy feat is in reality quite sophisticated. The cartoon drawing is a frozen silhouette of simple lines, while the living animal is awash in color, texture, movement and light. It can contort into different shapes and looks different from every angle. Humans excel at this kind of task.


A Map of the Brain Could Teach Machines to See Like You

AITopics Original Links

Take a three-year-old to the zoo, and she intuitively knows that the long-necked creature nibbling leaves is the same thing as the giraffe in her picture book. That superficially easy feat is in reality quite sophisticated. The cartoon drawing is a frozen silhouette of simple lines, while the living animal is awash in color, texture, movement and light. It can contort into different shapes and looks different from every angle. Humans excel at this kind of task.


A Map of the Brain Could Teach Machines to See Like You

#artificialintelligence

Take a three-year-old to the zoo, and she intuitively knows that the long-necked creature nibbling leaves is the same thing as the giraffe in her picture book. That superficially easy feat is in reality quite sophisticated. The cartoon drawing is a frozen silhouette of simple lines, while the living animal is awash in color, texture, movement and light. It can contort into different shapes and looks different from every angle. Humans excel at this kind of task.


Mapping the Brain to Build Better Machines Quanta Magazine

#artificialintelligence

Take a three year-old to the zoo, and she intuitively knows that the long-necked creature nibbling leaves is the same thing as the giraffe in her picture book. That superficially easy feat is in reality quite sophisticated. The cartoon drawing is a frozen silhouette of simple lines, while the living animal is awash in color, texture, movement and light. It can contort into different shapes and looks different from every angle. Humans excel at this kind of task.


Inside the Moonshot Effort to Finally Figure Out the Brain

MIT Technology Review

"Here's the problem with artificial intelligence today," says David Cox. Yes, it has gotten astonishingly good, from near-perfect facial recognition to driverless cars and world-champion Go-playing machines. And it's true that some AI applications don't even have to be programmed anymore: they're based on architectures that allow them to learn from experience. Yet there is still something clumsy and brute-force about it, says Cox, a neuroscientist at Harvard. "To build a dog detector, you need to show the program thousands of things that are dogs and thousands that aren't dogs," he says.