DNA secrets of Ice Age Europe unlocked

BBC News

A study of DNA from ancient human bones has helped unlock the secrets of Europe's Ice Age inhabitants. Researchers analysed the genomes of 51 individuals who lived between 45,000 years ago and 7,000 years ago. The results reveal details about the biology of these early inhabitants, such as skin and eye colour, and how different populations were related. It also shows that Neanderthal ancestry in Europeans has been shrinking over time, perhaps due to natural selection. The study in Nature journal shines a torchlight over some 40,000 years of prehistory, showing that ancient patterns of migration were just as complex as those in more recent times.


The 'founding fathers' of Europe: DNA reveals all Europeans are related to a group that lived around Belgium 35,000 years ago

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Modern humans arrived in Europe 45,000 years ago but little is known about how they spread across the continent before the introduction of farming. Now, researchers carrying out the most detailed genetic analysis of Upper Paleolithic Europeans to date have discovered a major new lineage of early modern humans. This group, which lived in the northwest 35,000 years ago, directly contributed to the ancestry of present-day Europeans and is believed to have been formed of the'founding fathers' of Europe. Researchers carrying out the most detailed genetic analysis of Upper Paleolithic Europeans to date have discovered a major new lineage of early modern humans. This group, which lived in the northwest around 35,000 years ago, directly contributed to the ancestry of present-day Europeans (artist's impression pictured) Archaeological studies have previously found modern humans swept into Europe 45,000 years ago.


Humans arrived in Arabia 10,000 YEARS earlier than thought

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The last Ice Age made much of the globe uninhabitable, but there were oases - or refugia - where populations managed to survive. By studying a rare DNA lineage, researchers have discovered that one of these shelters existed in what is now Southern Arabia. The findings prove humans were in Southern Arabia 10,000 years earlier than first thought. A group from the University of Huddersfield has found humans were in Southern Arabia 10,000 years earlier than first thought. A group from the University of Huddersfield, specialising in the analysis of human DNA, found new evidence there was one or more of these shelters in what is now Southern Arabia.


Game of bones? Ancient genes uncover prehistoric European drama.

Christian Science Monitor | Science

A new study sheds light on the genetic composition of early modern humans, who arrived in Europe about 45,000 years ago and lived for millennia alongside our extinct cousins, the Neanderthals. In analyzing DNA from the ancient bones – 45,000 to 7,000 years old – of 51 of these prehistoric humans, an international team of scientists found evidence of population turnover and waves of migration during European prehistory, driven by advancing and retreating glaciers. The last ice age peaked between 25,000 and 19,000 years ago, at which time glaciers covered Scandinavia and northern Europe. "The demographic history of early European populations was much more dynamic than previously thought," said Cosimo Posth, an archaeogenetics PhD student at the University of Tübingen in Germany, reported New Scientist. He and his fellow authors of a paper published May 2 in the journal Nature reported that the genetic patterns they found in their analysis show that all of their specimens younger than 37,000 years old, gathered from across Europe and western Asia, descended from a single population.


Game of bones? Ice Age European drama revealed by 51 genomes

Christian Science Monitor | Science

A new study sheds light on the genetic composition of early modern humans, who arrived in Europe about 45,000 years ago and lived for millennia alongside our extinct cousins, the Neanderthals. In analyzing DNA from the ancient bones – 45,000 to 7,000 years old – of 51 of these prehistoric humans, a team of international scientists found evidence of population turnover and waves of migration during European prehistory, driven by advancing and retreating glaciers. The last ice age peaked between 25,000 and 19,000 years ago, at which time glaciers covered Scandinavia and northern Europe. "The demographic history of early European populations was much more dynamic than previously thought," said Cosimo Posth, an archaeogenetics PhD student at the University of Tübingen in Germany, reported New Scientist. He and his fellow authors of a paper published May 2 in the journal Nature reported that the genetic patterns they found in their analysis show that all of their specimens younger than 37,000 years old, gathered from across Europe and western Asia, descended from a single population.