47 digital health companies that raised money in the second quarter of 2016

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As we do every quarter, MobiHealthNews has rounded up our Q2 2016 coverage into a handful of longform stories. This section is on funding. In the second quarter of 2016, MobiHealthNews tracked funding for health tech companies that totaled about 500 million, not including an 80 million raise from tech-savvy health insurance company Bright Health, which is given an honorable mention at the end of the list. Here are 47 digital health companies that raised money in the second quarter of 2016: HealthPrize Technologies, a medication-adherence company, raised an undisclosed sum in a second round of funding. More FareWell raised 8.5 million for digital weight loss coaching service, with funding from individual investors including David Perry, the company's cofounder and chairman.


Nutrino Looks to Improve Your Health Through Data Analytics

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If you could improve your health by using data-powered advice based on your body's nutritional input, wouldn't that be something you would want to do? That seems to be the viewpoint of an investor from the New York Angels group, who has given nutrition analytics and data startup Nutrino $8 million to complete its Series A funding. In a field of science where we find out how food affects the human body so we can focus on healing, disease prevention, and chronic condition management, this San Francisco and Tel Aviv-based startup is leading the way through an easy-to-use app. One day eggs are bad for you, and the next day they are recommended? Within a complex science where dietitians sometimes contradict one another on what is the best nutritional recourse for their patients, the clear path through the differences in advice are the hard facts that you can derive from machine learning.


What To Eat For Breakfast? High-Energy Food Beneficial For Obese, Diabetes Patients

International Business Times

A high-energy breakfast can help with weight loss and also proves beneficial for Type 2 diabetes patients by decreasing the need for insulin, a recent study presented Saturday at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago stated. "This study shows that, in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetes patients, a diet with three meals per day, consisting of a big breakfast, average lunch and small dinner, had many rapid and positive effects compared to the traditional diet with six small meals evenly distributed throughout the day: better weight loss, less hunger and better diabetes control while using less insulin," lead study author Daniela Jakubowicz, professor of medicine at Tel Aviv University said. "The hour of the day -- when you eat and how frequently you eat -- is more important than what you eat and how many calories you eat," she noted. A slice of bread consumed at breakfast leads to a lower glucose response and is less fattening than an identical slice of bread consumed in the evening," Jakubowicz added. The study involved 18 men and 11 women with average age of 69 years suffering from Type 2 diabetes and obesity.


1 in 5 deaths worldwide linked to unhealthy diet: study

The Japan Times

LONDON - Eleven million deaths worldwide in 2017 were linked to people eating poor diets high in sugar, salt and processed meat that contributed to heart disease, cancer and diabetes, a global study found. The research, published in the Lancet medical journal, found that among 195 countries studied, the proportion of diet-related deaths was highest in Uzbekistan and lowest in Israel. The United States ranked 43rd, while Britain was 23rd, China 140th and India 118th. Consumption of healthier foods such as nuts and seeds, milk and whole grains was on average too low, and people consumed too many sugary drinks and too much processed meat and salt. This led to one in five deaths in 2017 being linked to bad diets.


Walnuts Make You Feel Less Hungry, Help Fight Against Fatty Food Cravings

International Business Times

A new study conducted by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston showed that eating walnuts can help curb hunger. The study, conducted by Olivia M. Farr, Dario Tuccinardi, Jagriti Upadhyay, Sabrina M. Oussaada, and Christos S. Mantzoros, was published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism on Aug. 17, 2017. "We don't often think about how what we eat impacts the activity in our brain," Olivia M. Farr, Ph.D., instructor in medicine at BIDMC, and a co-researcher of the study said. "We know people report feeling fuller after eating walnuts, but it was pretty surprising to see evidence of activity changing in the brain related to food cues, and by extension what people were eating and how hungry they feel," she added, Medical Daily reported. Participants were under scrutiny for two five-day sessions during the study.