Who Is Patricia Gualinga? Social Good Summit Speaker Earns Standing Ovation For Environmental Work In Ecuador Rainforest

International Business Times

Environmental conservationist hero Patricia Gualinga and the indigenous people of Sarayaku in the Ecuadorian Amazon were on Monday given a big platform, with a little help from actor Alec Baldwin. Baldwin hosted a panel discussion on indigenous peoples and climate change at the Social Good Summit in New York City Monday. Among his guests was Gualinga, the International Relations Director for the indigenous community of Sarayaku, whose tireless efforts to protect the rainforest in her homeland has made her an icon in the environmentalist community. "We want to be heard. We want the opportunity to amplify our voices and to show that this is our contribution," Gualinga said.


H&M stops buying Brazilian leather over Amazon rainforest fires

FOX News

World leaders are urging action from G7 on the burning of the Amazon rainforest. Low-cost fashion retailer H&M said Friday it is suspending leather purchases from Brazil to make sure it is not supporting cattle farming that may be contributing to the fires in the Amazon rainforest. The move by the Stockholm-based company follows a similar decision by the maker of Vans and Timberland shoes. Some international investors are also trying to put pressure on the Brazilian government, which has been seen as too lax in its approach to protecting the rainforest. Hennes & Mauritz AB said its temporary ban on leather from Brazil will remain in place "until there are credible assurances ... that the leather does not contribute to environmental harm in the Amazon."


Amazon fires: By the numbers

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for August 27 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com The raging fires in Brazil's Amazon rainforest have captured the public's imagination worldwide for the last few weeks and recently prompted the country to declare a state of emergency in the region. The blazes, which are actually visible from space, are generally thought to be the result of land being cleared for farming and ranching, though Brazil's president, Jair Bolsonaro, has claimed without evidence that the fires were started by nongovernmental organizations. Bolsonaro has also been criticized for relaxing the enforcement of laws meant to prevent deforestation, while simultaneously encouraging mining and farming across a wide swath of the region since he was inaugurated.


Fires just one of the dangers facing the world's largest rainforest

The Japan Times

LIMA – Wildfires are just one of the dangers facing the world's largest rainforest. The Amazon, covering 5.5 million square kilometers (2.1 million square miles) over nine countries, faces ever more serious threats from encroaching crop and livestock farming, mining, land occupation and illegal logging. Deforestation for farming is one of the most serious threats to the rainforest, a problem common to all nine jurisdictions: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. "The main cause of deforestation is the advancing agricultural boundary," said Jose Luis Capella, director of a forest plantation program in Peru, 13 percent of which is covered by the Amazon basin. A case in point is Ecuador, where agricultural land increased by 23 percent between 2000 and 2017 -- gouged from its share of the Amazon basin region.


Ecuador tribe's victory in legal battle over selling ancestral Amazon land is upheld

The Japan Times

BOGOTA - A court in Ecuador has upheld a ruling that prevents the government from selling land in the Amazon rainforest to oil companies, a move activists called a historic win for the Waorani indigenous tribe living there. The government had appealed an earlier court ruling in April that the 2,000-strong tribe had not been properly consulted over plans to auction their ancestral lands to oil companies. The decision late on Thursday from Pastaza province in the eastern Amazon to uphold the ruling ends the years-long legal battle over the land, campaigners said. "This victory is for my ancestors. And it's for the whole world," said Nemonte Nenquimo, president of the Waorani Pastaza Organization on Friday.