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Piepacker Gives Retro Games an Online Co-Op Upgrade

WIRED

It used to require a lot of time and effort to play old-school retro games, but things have gotten a lot easier. It's as simple as picking up a retro game console or an emulator, or downloading your favorite classic collection on your PC and console. Some of my fondest memories feature friends and family playing together on the big tube TV or gathering into a room for LAN parties. Sure, these days you can still trash talk each other, coordinate team maneuvers, or chat and joke with gaming headsets over the internet, but it doesn't quite feel the same. There's something about seeing the horrified face of the person you just blasted into oblivion, witnessing their protracted victory dance after a win, or just laughing together that elevates the whole experience.


With Ataribox, the Legend Returns -- Powered by Linux

ZDNet

Have you played Atari today? Once a jingle's catchphrase as well as a legitimate query, a resurrected version of the brand is hoping you'll soon be asking that question again with the forthcoming Ataribox.


How to build a Raspberry Pi retrogaming emulation console

PCWorld

This RetroPie really happened: Watch (above) as our own Adam Patrick Murray and Alaina Yee build a RetroPie system after they weren't able to buy an SNES Classic. Go ahead, laugh at (and learn from) our mistakes. For the past 20 years, retrogaming enthusiasts have dreamed of building a "universal game console" capable of playing games from dozens of different systems. Their ideal was inexpensive, easy to control with a gamepad, and capable of hooking into a TV set. Thanks to the Raspberry Pi 3 hobbyist platform and the RetroPie software distribution, that dream is finally possible. For under $110, you can build a very nice emulation system that can play tens of thousands of retro games for systems such as the NES, Atari 2600, Sega Genesis, Super NES, Game Boy, and even the PlayStation. All you need to do is buy a handful of components, put them together, and configure some software. You'll also have to provide the games, but we'll talk about that later.


How to build a Raspberry Pi retrogaming emulation console

PCWorld

This RetroPie really happened: Watch (above) as our own Adam Patrick Murray and Alaina Yee build a RetroPie system after they weren't able to buy an SNES Classic. Go ahead, laugh at (and learn from) our mistakes. For the past 20 years, retrogaming enthusiasts have dreamed of building a "universal game console" capable of playing games from dozens of different systems. Their ideal was inexpensive, easy to control with a gamepad, and capable of hooking into a TV set. Thanks to the Raspberry Pi 3 hobbyist platform and the RetroPie software distribution, that dream is finally possible. For under $110, you can build a very nice emulation system that can play tens of thousands of retro games for systems such as the NES, Atari 2600, Sega Genesis, Super NES, Game Boy, and even the PlayStation. All you need to do is buy a handful of components, put them together, and configure some software. You'll also have to provide the games, but we'll talk about that later.


Evercade review: A charming cartridge-based handheld for retro gaming enthusiasts

PCWorld

These days, you've got endless ways to play retro games using emulation on PCs, Raspberry Pis, or even Android phones--most with varying degrees of performance or legality. But the new Evercade handheld console is tackling retro gaming emulation in a highly focused and legally legitimate way. Unlike the recent flood of Chinese-based handheld emulators like the PocketGo V2, Evercade (the company) works with major publishers to release physical cartridges featuring tailored emulation so that each game plays the way you remember. If you're a retro game enthusiast looking to find easy, accurate, and legal ways to play titles from a variety of gaming eras--outside of buying the original hardware, of course--then the Evercade is worth a hard, long look. The Evercade has a clean and classic look.