Electronic devices banned on US-bound flights from 8 countries

New Scientist

Passengers travelling to the US on flights from eight different countries will be banned from carrying laptops, iPads, cameras and most other electronics in their carry-on luggage. The reason for the ban is not immediately clear. The ban was revealed on Monday in statements from Royal Jordanian Airlines and the official news agency of Saudi Arabia. It will apply to non-stop flights to the US from 10 international airports serving the cities of Cairo in Egypt; Amman in Jordan; Kuwait City in Kuwait; Casablanca in Morocco; Doha in Qatar; Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia; Istanbul in Turkey; and Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, according to a US official. Royal Jordanian said mobile phones and medical devices were excluded from the ban.


Emirates, Turkish Airlines Taken Off US Laptop Ban

International Business Times

The United States lifted a ban Wednesday that required laptops and other electronic devices to be put in the luggage when flying on Emirates Airlines and Turkish Airlines. U.S. Homeland Security introduced the ban in March over concerns that the large devices could be used to smuggle explosives into the cabins of planes. "Emirates has been working hard in coordination with various aviation stakeholders and the local authorities to implement heightened security measures and protocols that meet the requirements of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's new security guidelines for all U.S. bound flights," the airline said in a statement Wednesday. The ban was put in place in March and restricted items such as laptop computers, tablets, cameras, travel printers and games bigger than a phone. The ban has affected foreign-carrier planes flying from 10 countries to America: Amman, Jordan; Cairo; Istanbul; Jidda and Riyadh in Saudi Arabia; Kuwait City; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.


DHS chief hints laptop ban may not be extended right now

AP World Headlines

WASHINGTON (AP) -- It may not be necessary to expand a ban on laptops and other large electronics in the cabins of many international flights into the United States right now, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Tuesday. Homeland Security first banned laptops and other large electronics from the cabins of flights headed to the United States from 10 cities in March amid concerns about an undisclosed threat described only as sophisticated and ongoing. The current ban applies to nonstop flights to the United States from Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Cairo; Istanbul; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. An electronics ban affecting nonstop flights from Europe would impact as many as 400 daily flights carrying about 85,000 passengers.



5 Reasons Banning Laptops On Flights From Muslim-Majority Countries Is Stupid And Dangerous

Forbes - Tech

Emirates is one of many airlines affected by the DHS ban on certain devices on America-bound planes from eight Muslim-majority countries. They have 96 hours to impose the ban. Aviation security experts are looking agog at the Department of Homeland Security's decision to ban a range of electronic devices larger than a cellphone from being taken on U.S.-bound flight cabins from 10 airports in countries that are Muslim-majority. They told Forbes it makes little-to-no sense in terms of how it will protect travellers and may well have adverse effects. Human rights activists are concerned as well, given the regions it targets are Muslim-majority, including airports in Cairo, Istanbul, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates.