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Orca AI Just Started Trials for Autonomous Ship Safety Systems

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Artificial intelligence could one day organize the world. As if in anticipation of this, a maritime platform developer called Orca AI has just begun a research trial of new safety systems for autonomous ships, equipping a vessel with artificial intelligence that recognizes other ships to safely guide it through busy sea traffic, according to a recent press release from the company. Orca AI was founded in 2018 by a pair of naval tech experts, and designs software platforms with extreme specificity for maritime vessels. The firm blends existing safety systems with sensors to enhance the navigation and safety of vessels making their way through crowded (and sometimes dangerous) waterways. Orca AI is headquartered in Israel, and aims to link sea-bound vessels with 24/7 land-based AI insights.


Huge fleets of Chinese boats have been hiding in North Korean waters

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Huge fleets of Chinese fishing boats have been caught stealthily operating in North Korean waters – while having their tracking systems turned off. The potentially illegal fishing operation was revealed through a combination of artificial intelligence, radar and satellite data. A study published today in the journal Science Advances details how more than 900 vessels of Chinese origin (over 900 in 2017 and over 700 in 2018) likely caught more than 160,000 metric tons --close to half a billion dollars' worth -- of Pacific flying squid over two years. This may be in violation of United Nations sanctions, which began restricting North Korea from foreign fishing in September 2017 following the country's ballistic missile tests. Illegal fishing threatens fish stocks and maritime ecosystem, and can also jeopardise food security for legitimate fishers.


Steering With Artificial Intelligence To Combat Maritime Piracy

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Besides, the frailty of the human body can lead to lapses which are gleefully exploited by pirates to the detriment of the crew, sometimes with tragic consequences. It begs the uncomfortable question of whether the shipping industry is at the mercy of the pirates and robbers in the highs seas and what else, if any, can be done to improve the current situation. Seafarers who have encountered pirates hijack often say they never saw the pirates coming. In most of the cases, they are not able to identify it, especially when pirates use small fishing boats as a disguise. In order to curb unprecedented piracy attacks, maritime situational awareness is vital to provide crew members with a comprehensive understanding of the activities in surrounding waters and present opportunities to detect and mitigate threats or any vulnerabilities before any further damage or adversity happens.


Japan developing artificial intelligence system to monitor suspicious activity at sea

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TOKYO (WASHINGTON POST) - Japan is working to develop technology that will fully utilise artificial intelligence (AI) to detect suspicious vessels, according to sources. Aimed at strengthening maritime surveillance capabilities in waters around Japan, the envisioned technology is projected to be used for such purposes as monitoring North Korean ship-to-ship cargo transfers in international waters, the sources said. The government aims to start testing the AI-based technology in fiscal year 2021 using vessels of the Self-Defence Forces. The system will analyse information automatically transmitted by radio from the Automatic Identification System on board many ships. The AI will learn an enormous amount of information on the location and speed of ships, making it possible to automatically detect abnormalities such as ships navigating far away from ordinary routes or in the opposite direction.


AI Helped Uncover Chinese Boats Hiding in North Korean Waters

WIRED

Huge fleets of Chinese fishing boats have been caught stealthily operating in North Korean waters--while having their tracking systems turned off. The potentially illegal fishing operation was revealed through a combination of artificial intelligence, radar and satellite data. This story originally appeared on WIRED UK. A study published today in the journal Science Advances details how more than 900 vessels of Chinese origin (over 900 in 2017 and over 700 in 2018) likely caught more than 160,000 metric tons--close to half a billion dollars' worth--of Pacific flying squid over two years. This may be in violation of United Nations sanctions, which began restricting North Korea from foreign fishing in September 2017 following the country's ballistic missile tests.