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Forget About Self-Driving Cars, Just Make A Robot That Can Drive

#artificialintelligence

Do you know a smarmy person that thinks they always have a better idea or a canny way to solve a vexing problem? If so, you likely know that they often try to gleefully pop a balloon on existing approaches to solving things and offer a seemingly wholly new suggestion, somewhat out-of-the-blue, causing you to pause for thought about their eureka moment. Let's consider the realm of self-driving cars. There are billions upon billions of dollars being expended towards trying to design, develop, build, and field a true self-driving car. True self-driving cars are ones that the AI drives the car entirely on its own and there isn't any human assistance during the driving task.


Tesla's Autopilot fails haven't shaken my faith in self-driving cars. Here's why.

Mashable

It looks bleak out there for autonomous vehicles. A pedestrian was killed in the first self-driving car accident with an Uber test vehicle, and then a driver in a semi-autonomous Tesla fatally crashed into a highway barrier. Earlier this month, a terrifying video purportedly showed Tesla's Autopilot feature sending a car straight into danger. But despite the setbacks to self-driving industry, I can't help but be optimistic that pedestrian, driver, and passenger deaths will keep going down. As this new technology is tested and developed, the road will get safer and safer.


Experts tell NHTSA to slow down on self-driving cars

U.S. News

Engineers, safety advocates and even automakers have a safety message for federal regulators eager to get self-driving cars on the road: slow down. Fully self-driving cars may be the future of the automotive industry, but they aren't yet up to the demands of real-world driving, several people told the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration during a public meeting Friday. A slower, more deliberative approach may be needed instead of the agency's rapid timetable for producing guidance for deploying the vehicles, according to an auto industry trade association. In January, the federal agency announced that it would begin work on writing guidance for deploying the vehicles. Officials have promised to complete that guidance by July.


Uber's self-driving cars are still a 'science experiment,' report says

Mashable

Business Insider reports that Uber's self-driving tech is still far behind competitors like Waymo. The report, which cites interviews with employees in Uber's Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), compares the self-driving cars project to a "science experiment," and says that the cars "perform reliably only on limited well-mapped routes, and aren't making much progress on handling more." That may sound like a harsh assessment, but as BI points out, Uber has had other priorities besides autonomous driving alone. Since the company resumed testing its self-driving cars in December following a fatal accident in Arizona, Uber has been progressing much more slowly. It's possible the cautious approach is frustrating to some employees, who may want to see more rapid improvements in the underlying technology rather than safety-related updates alone.


Uber self-driving cars hit the streets of San Francisco

Associated Press

Uber is bringing a small number of self-driving cars to its ride-hailing service in San Francisco - a move likely to both excite the city's tech-savvy population and spark a conflict with California regulators. Uber is bringing a small number of self-driving cars to its ride-hailing service in San Francisco - a move likely to both excite the city's tech-savvy population and spark a conflict with California regulators. Uber is bringing a small number of self-driving cars to its ride-hailing service in San Francisco - a move likely to both excite the city's tech-savvy population and spark a conflict with California regulators. Uber is bringing a small number of self-driving cars to its ride-hailing service in San Francisco - a move likely to both excite the city's tech-savvy population and spark a conflict with California regulators.