Hollywood removes Netflix from its legal streaming site search engine

The Independent - Tech

Netflix has mysteriously been removed from the American film industry's search engine for legal streaming sites. WhereToWatch, which was set up by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) in 2014, lets users search a range of legal streaming services for their favourite TV shows and films. The idea was to provide internet users with a handy resource which would steer them away from illegal streams and downloads, protecting them from potential legal trouble and helping the studios at the same time. However, as TorrentFreak reports, Netflix has been removed from the WhereToWatch search results, despite being the one of the most-used legal streaming services in the world. Netflix results have also been removed from the UK equivalent of the site, FindAnyFilm, although some Netflix results are still available on GoWatchIt, the search engine which powers WhereToWatch.


Search Engines Get a Machine Language Boost

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Online retailer eBay is attempting to extend its machine language capabilities beyond automatic language translation to e-commerce uses designed to make product searches more relevant. As automation improves, the company said one goal eliminating the search box. Meanwhile, development cycles have been reduced as more machine learning libraries are released to the open source community. "As machines get better at decoding natural language, commerce should become increasingly conversational -- eventually rendering the search box redundant," eBay CEO Devin Wenig noted recently. Wenig added that the pace of machine intelligence development has quickened over the last year.


New AI-Based Search Engines are a "Game Changer" for Science Research

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A free AI-based scholarly search engine that aims to outdo Google Scholar is expanding its corpus of papers to cover some 10 million research articles in computer science and neuroscience, its creators announced on 11 November. Since its launch last year, it has been joined by several other AI-based academic search engines, most notably a relaunched effort from computing giant Microsoft. Semantic Scholar, from the non-profit Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) in Seattle, Washington, unveiled its new format at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego. Some scientists who were given an early view of the site are impressed. "This is a game changer," says Andrew Huberman, a neurobiologist at Stanford University, California.


A search engine could become the first true artificial intelligence

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Everything in our online life is indexed. Every idle tweet, status update, or curious search query feeds the Google database. The tech giant recently bought a leading artificial-intelligence research outlet, and it already has a robotics company on its books. So what if Google, or Facebook, or any of the companies we entrust our information to, wanted to use our search histories to create an artificially intelligent robot? Writer and director Alex Garland's new film, Ex Machina, looks at just that.


Microsoft Creates Artificial Intelligence Research Group Sci-Tech Today

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The move comes as Qi Lu, a longtime Microsoft engineering leader who was most recently executive vice president of the Applications and Services Group that includes Bing and Office, leaves the company to focus on his recovery from a bicycle accident. Lu, a former Yahoo engineer with dozens of patents to his name, is widely respected within the technology industry, but a rare public speaker outside of it. Satya Nadella, Microsoft's chief executive, worked for Lu when Nadella led engineering work on the Bing search engine. "Qi exemplifies what it means to have a deep sense of mission, purpose and authenticity in everything one does," Nadella said in an email to employees on Thursday. "His greatest impact is the people he has inspired.