Facebook is under investigation by state attorneys general for antitrust violations

#artificialintelligence

A group of states is investigating Facebook for potential violations of antitrust law, the office of the New York attorney general said in a statement today. The investigation is being led by New York Attorney General Letitia James, and it includes the attorneys general from Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and the District of Columbia. "Even the largest social media platform in the world must follow the law and respect consumers," James said in the statement. "I am proud to be leading a bipartisan coalition of attorneys general in investigating whether Facebook has stifled competition and put users at risk." The statement said the investigation will focus on whether Facebook "endangered consumer data, reduced the quality of consumers' choices, or increased the price of advertising."


Google's location privacy practices are under investigation in Arizona

Washington Post - Technology News

Google's alleged practice of recording location data about Android device owners even when they believe they have opted out of such tracking has sparked an investigation in Arizona, where the state's attorney general could potentially levy a hefty fine against the search giant. The probe, initiated by Republican Attorney General Mark Brnovich and confirmed by a person familiar with his thinking but not authorized to speak on the record, could put pressure on other states and the federal government to follow suit, consumer advocates say -- although Google previously insisted it did not deceive consumers about the way it collects and taps data on their whereabouts. The attorney general signaled his interest in the matter in a public filing that indicated the office had retained an outside law firm to assist in an investigation. The document, dated Aug. 21, said the hired lawyers would help probe an unnamed tech company and its "storage of consumer location data, tracking of consumer location, and other consumer tracking through . . . The document was dated just over a week after an investigation by the Associated Press found that Google devices and services store time-stamped location data even for users who believed they had turned off that data collection.


Who gets the extra $15 million? A federal judge in NYC telecom case wants to know

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

File photo taken in 2013 shows a Sprint logo is displayed on a smart phone in Montpelier, Vt. (Photo: Toby Talbot, AP) NEW YORK Of the thousands of lawsuits meandering through Manhattan federal court, few may be more curious than the matter that brings together a major U.S. telecommunications company, a federal regulator, state legal officials, an attentive judge, and $15.14 million up for grabs. Starring Sprint, (S) the nation's fourth-largest wireless carrier, the court drama opened in 2014 when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau accused the Kansas-based company of "cramming" -- allowing unauthorized third-party to add fraudulent charges to customers' cell phone bills. Victims were billed without their consent after they unwittingly clicked on purported "free" digital content such as ringtones or daily horoscopes, the CFPB said in a federal court filing. Scene II featured Sprint and the CFPB seeking approval of a $50 million proposed settlement designed to repay affected customers. The deal proposed that any leftover money would go to the U.S. Treasury, where it would benefit taxpayers.


Who gets the extra $15 million? A federal judge in telecom case wants to know

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

File photo taken in 2013 shows a Sprint logo is displayed on a smart phone in Montpelier, Vt. (Photo: Toby Talbot, AP) NEW YORK Of the thousands of lawsuits meandering through Manhattan federal court, few may be more curious than the matter that brings together a major U.S. telecommunications company, a federal regulator, state legal officials, an attentive judge, and $15.14 million up for grabs. Starring Sprint, (S) the nation's fourth-largest wireless carrier, the court drama opened in 2014 when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau accused the Kansas-based company of "cramming" -- allowing unauthorized third-party to add fraudulent charges to customers' cell phone bills. Victims were billed without their consent after they unwittingly clicked on purported "free" digital content such as ringtones or daily horoscopes, the CFPB said in a federal court filing. Scene II featured Sprint and the CFPB seeking approval of a $50 million proposed settlement designed to repay affected customers. The deal proposed that any leftover money would go to the U.S. Treasury, where it would benefit taxpayers.


Ferguson-Legislature Spat Highlights Attorney General's Role

U.S. News

In an email to the Legislature's legal team, one of Ferguson's top advisers, Solicitor General Noah Purcell, dismissed concerns about any conflict of interest. He noted that unlike private law firms, public firms -- such as the Attorney General's Office or prosecuting attorneys -- must sometimes represent clients whose interests don't align. In such cases, they set up "screens," ensuring that employees involved in one client's case don't work on or become privy to confidential information about the other client's.