Australian government agencies testing but not implementing emerging tech: Accenture

ZDNet

Almost two thirds, or 65 percent, of Australian public sector agencies are willing to adopt new technologies, but only a small percentage move beyond the pilot phase to full implementation, according to a new study by Accenture. The Emerging Technologies in Public Service report found that 42 percent of public sector agencies are implementing biometrics and identity analytics, 36 percent are implementing advanced analytics, and 29 percent are implementing intelligent process automation. TPG to focus on FttB, mobile, corporate business to manage NBN margin squeeze Productivity Commission draft report calls time on USO as NBN looms Risk vs. Opportunity: Data use and availability in Australia NSW government seeks partner to trial Uber-like public transport Optus inks AU$40m contract extension with security firm Suretek This suggests that awareness of emerging technologies is not translating into realised value for the majority of agencies surveyed, the report said. Speaking at the Reimagination Thought Leaders Summit, Stephen Conroy, former minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, said risk-aversion, inadequate skills, outdated procurement practices, siloed departments, and lack of commercial imperatives for change are why Australia has struggled to translate technology into productivity gains, especially at a government level. About 37 percent of the Australian agencies already implementing advanced analytics technologies said their primary objective is to automate existing processes.


ASX-listed Oventus Medical opens 3D printing facility with CSIRO

ZDNet

Brisbane-based Oventus Medical has opened a new 3D printing facility at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's (CSIRO) Clayton, Victoria campus. The facility builds on an existing partnership between Oventus and CSIRO, and will see the publicly-traded company produce its O2Vent device, a customisable, 3D-printed titanium mouthguard designed ensure optimal airflow and reduce the effects of snoring for sleep apnoea sufferers. Australian government agencies testing but not implementing emerging tech: Accenture Reserve Bank weighs in on digital wallet competition discussion TPG to focus on FttB, mobile, corporate business to manage NBN margin squeeze Productivity Commission draft report calls time on USO as NBN looms Risk vs. Opportunity: Data use and availability in Australia Oventus has been developing O2Vent for almost three years, and an initial prototype of the O2Vent, which completed successful clinical trials, was 3D-printed using CSIRO's 3D printing facility, Lab22. According to Dr Keith McLean, research director of CSIRO manufacturing, the collaboration between Australian researchers and industry is paving the way for innovation in 3D design and production processes, as well as the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea. "Combining our research team's additive manufacturing experience with the software capabilities of CSIRO's Data61, meant we could create a one-stop in-house process for making personalised mouth pieces that are individualised for each Oventus customer," McLean said in a statement.


Federal Court approves AU$349m ASG acquisition

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IT management and consultancy firm ASG Group expects to be wholly acquired by Japan's Nomura Research Institute (NRI) before the year is out, after the Federal Court of Australia gave the nod to the arrangement on Monday. Announced in September, NRI will pay approximately AU$349 million for 100 percent ownership of ASG. ASG told shareholders on Monday that a copy of the court's order is to be lodged with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) by the end of the day, which will result in the acquisition scheme being legally effective. As ASG is currently listed on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX), once ASIC receives the documentation, ASG shares will be suspended from trading. The implementation date for the acquisition is expected to be December 23, 2016.


Backdoor vulnerabilities discovered in Sony IP cameras

ZDNet

Researchers have discovered backdoors in Sony IPELA Engine IP cameras which could affect as many as 80 models. Cybersecurity firm SEC Consult said on Wednesday that the security flaw allows attackers to remotely execute code, hijack vulnerable cameras, disrupt device functionality, and spy on users. In addition, the backdoor grants attackers the opportunity to add compromised Sony IP cameras to botnets as slave nodes, in the same manner that cyberattackers used the IoT-based Mirai botnet to disrupt online services. The security flaw, deemed critical, lies in backdoors which allow attackers to enable the Telnet/SSH service remotely. Once this backdoor has been used, a secondary backdoor leads the way to a Linux shell with root privileges.


Here are some best practices for preventing DDoS attacks

ZDNet

Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) made lots of headlines in late October when a massive DDoS attack on Domain Name System (DNS) service provider Dyn temporarily disrupted some of the most popular sites on the internet. As with any other major cyber security breach, the attack likely has many boards of directors and CEOs wondering whether their organization might be next, and what can be done to defend against such incidents. DDoS attacks are clearly on the rise. A report by content delivery network provider Akamai earlier this year said such incidents are increasing in number, severity and duration. It noted a 125 percent increase in DDoS attacks year over year and a 35 percent jump in the average attack duration.