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Frankenstein, AI and humanity's love of fearing technology

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In 1818, the first copy of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was published. Two hundred years later, it's still our go-to monster story, even if the cultural images we associate with it owe more to Boris Karloff's portrayal of the monster than Mary Shelley's original novel. Only a handful of books maintain relevance beyond a decade, let alone 200 years – yet Frankenstein endures to this day and still offers instant shorthand for cultural touchstones. Even the name Frankenstein conjures up images of a frightening hotchpotch concoction that isn't natural and shouldn't exist: Frankenfoods, Frankenbabies, and even Frankenalgorithms. That latter of these is important.


Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature

AITopics Original Links

Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature is a new traveling exhibition that encourages audiences to examine the intent of Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein, and to discuss Shelley's and their own views about personal and societal responsibility as it relates to science and other areas of life. Frankenstein will visit 80 libraries across the country between October 2002 and December 2005. In addition to the exhibition, participating libraries will host interpretive and educational programs that help audiences examine Mary Shelley's novel and how it uses scientific experimentation as metaphor to comment on cultural values, especially the importance of exercising responsibility toward individuals and the community in all areas of human activity, including science. Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature was developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in collaboration with the ALA Public Programs Office. It has been made possible by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Washington, D.C., and the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Md.


Hunting for Frankenstein Amid Switzerland's Melting Glaciers and Nuclear Bunkers

WIRED

Most people visit the Swiss Alps to ski or hike, maybe to launder money. British photographer Chloe Dewe Mathews went to find Frankenstein. Mathews, a fan, brought along her old copy to read, letting the text guide her journey through the landscape. "My eyes scanned the barren white lands for Frankenstein's creature, crossing the glacier at'super-human speed'," she writes in the introduction to her new photo book, In Search of Frankenstein - Mary Shelley's Nightmare. "I imagined catching a darting figure in my peripheral vision or coming across a makeshift cabin that had sheltered the fugitive for the night."


Baby named Frankenstein born on Halloween

FOX News

Oskar Gray Frankenstein arrived four days past his due date, and joins an older sister who shares a birthday with "Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley. Florida parents Kyle and Jessica Frankenstein welcomed their baby, Oskar Gray Frankenstein, into the world early Tuesday at the Winter Park Memorial Hospital outside of Orlando, WKMG Orlando reported. "He was due four days ago and he decided to wait until Halloween," her grandmother Jennifer Frankenstein told the station. The baby weighed in at six pounds and 9 ounces, and is 20 inches long, The Associated Press reported. Jennifer Frankenstein also said she has a 13-year-old daughter who shares a birthday with "Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley.


As Frankenstein Turns 200, Can We Control Our Modern "Monsters"? - Midnight in the Desert

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In 1797, at the dawn of the industrial age, Goethe wrote "The Sorcerer's Apprentice," a poem about a magician-in-training who, through his arrogance and half-baked powers, unleashes a chain of events he cannot control.